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RURAL AND SUBURBAN MAIL COURIERS (RSMC)

 

Conversion of Door-to-Door Delivery to CMB Delivery

February 6, 2014  

Staffing / Bulletin

2011-2015/245

With the proposed conversion of urban door-to-door delivery (D2D) to Community Mail Box (CMB) delivery, we can expect to lose almost 5,800 full-time equivalent (FTE) letter carrier routes. This is more than 40% of the 14,187 FTE routes we now have.  When you include the Group 2 relief positions and the depot assistant and depot PO4 positions we will also lose when we lose these routes, you are looking at a loss of close to 7,000 FTE jobs.

This loss comes on top of the huge hit letter carriers have already taken due to Postal Transformation (PT) and the reduction in mail volume.  In the past  five years (since December 2008), we have lost 2,056 FTE letter carrier routes, as well as the attached relief and letter carrier support jobs.  And PT is not finished with us yet.

If the conversion to CMB delivery takes effect, in five years Canada will have less than half the letter carrier positions we had in 2008.  A FTE letter carrier route now has 660 points of call (POC), an extra 100 POC compared to just five years ago.  With CMB conversion, in another five years – even without growth or further letter mail erosion – letter carriers can expect to average 1,114 POC on their route.

 

RSMC Potential Impact

On the RSMC side we get 16.8 seconds to deliver mail to a Rural Mail Box (RMB) and 8.4 seconds to a CMB compartment. We deliver to more than 700,000 RMB. This represents a loss of 259 routes as the average RSMC route is 6 hours a day. This does not take into account the loss of kilometers and a much reduced number of stops. Make no mistake we must stop the attack on door-to-door mail delivery or the rural sector will be next.

 

Impact on the Work Floor

We are facing a 40 percent loss of urban routes.  Use this information to calculate the number of jobs we will lose in any depot by taking the number of foot routes and reducing that number by 40 percent.  For example, if we have 10 foot routes in an office we would lose 4 routes. Of course you can use the real numbers in any depot to come up with an average job loss that is more localized. 

 

Conservative Government’s Role – Let’s Fight Back

Also the Conservatives are not eliminating door-to-door delivery, they are handing this lucrative market to the private sector (UPS, Fed Ex, etc.)  If they take us out of the home delivery picture they will then remove the monopoly, and the exclusive privilege will have been flipped on its head in favour of the private sector.

On January 28th in the House of Commons the NDP vote took place on maintaining home delivery.  Like the sheep that they are, every Conservative MP stood up to defeat this motion.

 

Take Action

We need to start ensuring their constituents know about the position the Conservatives took.  We can do that by knocking on doors and handing out literature.  We can also deliver the message in the form of paid for unaddressed or addressed ad mail.  This could include a tear off message to be sent to any targeted Member of Parliament, or the MP’s e-mail address and phone number.

 

We go to every point of call every day and we need to talk to all the customers.  Give out literature after work hours including on weekends.  There are over 13 million points of calls (urban, suburban and rural) in Canada.  We need to go to the House of Commons with a petition signed by at least one signature per household.  Imagine a petition with over 13 million signatures.

WE CAN STOP CANADA POST AND THE CONSERVATIVE GOVERNMENT’S PLAN TO HAND OVER DOOR-TO-DOOR MAIL DELIVERY TO UPS AND FED EX!

TAKE ACTION TODAY!

In solidarity,

Donald Lafleur
4th National Vice-President

bul_2011-2015-245-close to 7000 LC Jobs we must maintain - in PDF

 

 

RSMC & PRE Annual Leave: Need to Act Now for 2014

August 29, 2013

RSMC / Bulletin

2011-2015/192

 

RSMC Vacation Leave Year

Under clause 15.01 (a) of the collective agreement, RSMCs and permanent relief employees (PREs) are entitled to three (3) weeks’ vacation leave per calendar year, i.e. from January 1st to December 31st. Vacation leave is earned at a rate of one and one-quarter (1¼) days for each calendar month in which an employee receives pay.

Employees who have completed ten (10) years of continuous employment are entitled to four (4) weeks’ vacation leave per calendar year. Vacation leave are earned at a rate of one and two-thirds (1 2/3) days for each calendar month in which an employee receives pay.

In other words, anyone hired as an employee between January 1st and December 1st, 2004 and who has maintained his or her continuous service is entitled to this fourth week of annual leave.

 

Vacation Leave Schedule

Clause 15.02 (b) of the collective agreement provides for the following: “In postal installations where on call relief employees or permanent relief employees are employed, a vacation leave schedule for route holders and permanent relief shall be established […]. Route holders and permanent relief shall make their choice by seniority and shall be allowed to bid for only two (2) consecutive weeks of leave in the first round [of] bidding.”

 

Vacation Bidding

Clause 15.03 provides for the following: “In postal installations or approved groupings where on call relief employees and/or permanent and/or permanent relief employees are employed, the number of […] vacation leaves […] is determined by totalling the number of vacation leave entitlement weeks for the route holders and permanent relief employees in the postal installation or the approved groupings and dividing the total by fifty-two (52).”

 

Local Union-Management Meeting

We ask that local union officers immediately begin union-management consultation under Article 7 of the collective agreement to ensure vacation leave schedules are established well in advance. Any time of the year must be accessible for leave. The Corporation cannot block out any period.

Each RSMC and PRE in the postal installation or grouping of installations must bid, by seniority, for all of his or her accumulated weeks of vacation leave. In the first round of bidding, RSMCs and PREs can select only two consecutive weeks of leave. The remaining weeks are selected in the second round of bidding.

 

On Call Relief Employees

As specified in paragraph 5 of Appendix “E”, in postal installations with more than one on call relief employee, assignments to cover vacation leave not assigned to permanent relief shall be offered to on call relief employees in the order of their ranking dates on the seniority list for the postal installation or grouping of postal installations.

Paragraph 6 of Appendix “E” states that vacation pay will accumulate at four (4) percent of actual wages as defined in Appendix “A” of the collective agreement, throughout the calendar year and will be paid no later than March 31 of the following year.

 

Implementation

This work should be completed early enough to ensure implementation takes place prior to December 31, 2013. Should you encounter problems during this process, ask CUPW Regional Officers for assistance.

In solidarity,

Philippe Arbour
National Grievance Officer

bul_2011-2015-192_RSMC PRE anual Leave for 2014 - in PDF


Become a RSMC peer trainer

August 9, 2013  

Health and Safety / Bulletin

2011-2015/188

 

CUPW is looking for RSMC members who would like to be facilitators. This responsibility consists of delivering training to your Sisters and Brothers on the work floor. The training would include work methods and the use of the reaching device (RRD) for mail delivery to rural mailboxes.

Facilitators called upon to provide the training will be compensated the higher of either one hundred and thirty-five (135) dollars per day or their daily wage for any day of training related to the RRD system, less statutory deductions.

The Canada Post Travel Policy for Unionized Employees will be applied.

We are looking for trainers specifically in these locations:

  1. North Bay
  2. Sault Ste Marie
  3. Timmins
  4. Barrie
  5. Peterborough
  6. Muskoka
  7. Windsor
  8. Brantford

As a facilitator, you might be required to travel between offices in your region. Those who are interested should be readily available, be good communicators and have the ability to convey information effectively.

If interested, please contact your union representative or your local and leave your contact information (name, employee number, postal address, route name and post office) before August 30th.

In solidarity,

Serge Champoux
National Union Representative - Health and Safety

Become an RSMC Peer Trainer- in PDF

 

 

On-Call Relief Employees – Current Positions Maintained in Postal Installations with six (6) or more RSMC Routes - #3

August 7, 2013  

Staffing / Bulletin

2011-2015/187

Implementation

As of January 1st, 2014, under Appendix 'H' of the RSMC collective agreement, the Corporation will be responsible for covering all types of absences in installations with six (6) or more RSMC routes.

The Corporation must maintain or create and implement on-call relief employee (OCRE) positions to primarily, but not exclusively, cover vacation leave absences in all postal installations across the country with six (6) or more RSMC routes.

As stipulated in Appendix 'E', paragraph 11, all national memoranda of agreement regarding on-call relief employees are rendered null and void. The memorandum of agreement dated December 20, 2006 provided for the creation of the first 100 OCRE positions and established some of their working conditions. The memoranda of agreement signed on June 19 and 20, 2007 provided for the creation of another 200 OCRE positions and, finally, the memorandum of agreement dated December 12, 2007 amended a number of locations where OCREs were to be introduced.

The rights and benefits outlined in these memoranda of agreement have been incorporated into the different provisions of Appendix 'E', as well as various articles of the collective agreement (e.g. art. 8, 11, 12 …).  Appendix 'E', paragraph 9, states that the collective agreement applies to OCREs, except for the provisions listed.

 

Current OCRE positions maintained, including in seven (7) installations with less than six (6) routes

The postal installations initially selected for the implementation of the first 300 OCRE positions will continue to use OCREs or permanent relief employees (PRE) when the number of routes warrants. Seven (7) of these installations do not meet the minimum six (6) route requirement, but will continue to use OCREs.

 

Postal installations with six (6) or more routes that are entitled to On-Call Relief Employees (OCRE) – 195 positions are maintained:


 

Atlantic Region – CUPW

Bathurst (NB) Main (Belledune, Beresford, Robertville, Petit Rocher) = 2 OCRE
Caraquet (NB) (Grand Anse, Paquetville, Shippagan, Lamèque) = 2 OCRE
Miramichi (NB) Main = 2 OCRE
Tracadie-Sheila (NB) Main = 2 OCRE
Perth-Andover (NB) Main = 1 OCRE
Woodstock (NB) Main = 1 OCRE
Moncton (NB) LCD-2 = 0 OCRE
Moncton (NB) LCD-1 = 6 OCRE
Hampton (NB) Main = 1 OCRE
Charlottetown (PE) Main = 4 OCRE
St. John's (NL) Main = 8 OCRE
Enfield (NS) Main = 1 OCRE
Lakeside (NS) Main = 1 OCRE
Tantallon (NS) Main = 1 OCRE
Halifax (NS) LCD-1 = 3 OCRE
New Glasgow (NS) Main (Trenton, Westville, Stellarton) = 2 OCRE

 

Quebec Region – CUPW

L'Assomption (QC) SBC = 2 OCRE
Gatineau (QC) SBC = 3 OCRE
Beauceville  (QC) SBC (St-Joseph De Beauce, St-Odilon, Vallee Jonction) = 1 OCRE
Victoriaville (QC) SBC (Plessiville, Princeville) = 1 OCRE
Degelis (QC) Succ (Témiscouata Sur Le Lac, Cabano, Notre Dame Du Lac, Témiscouata Sur Le Lac NDDL) = 1 OCRE
Lac-Etchemin (QC) BDP (Standon, Ste-Justine, Ste-Rose De Watford) = 1 OCRE
Ste-Marie (QC) SBC (Scott, St-Bernard, St-Isidore-de-Dorchester, St-Patrice-de-Beaurivage) = 2 OCRE
Boischatel (QC) BDP (Château-Richer, Ste-Brigitte-de-Laval, Ile D'Orléans-St-Laurent, Ile D'Orléans-St-Pierre) = 2 OCRE
Chicoutimi (QC) PDF-Chicoutimi (Falardeau) = 1 OCRE
St-Ambroise (QC) SBC = 0 OCRE
St-Félicien (QC) SBC = 1 OCRE
St-Jean-Sur-Richelieu (QC) SBC = 2 OCRE

 

Metro-Montreal Region – CUPW

Beauharnois (QC) SBC = 1 OCRE
Beloeil (QC) SBC = 2 OCRE
St-Constant (QC) SBC = 2 OCRE
Ste-Catherine (QC) SBC = 2 OCRE
Repentigny (QC) SBC = 2 OCRE
Brossard (QC) PDF-Brossard-1 = 2 OCRE
Laval (QC) PDF-Duvernay = 3 OCRE

 

Central Region – CUPW

Picton (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Trenton (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Smiths Falls (ON) Main = 2 OCRE
Kingston (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Renfrew (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Peterborough (ON) Del Ctr = 2 OCRE
Gravenhurst (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Aurora (ON) Main = 3 OCRE
Cornwall (ON) LCD-1 = 1 OCRE
Nepean (ON) LCD-Merivale = 4 OCRE

 

Ontario Region – CUPW

Caledonia (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Simcoe (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Fonthill (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Waterdown (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Hamilton (ON) LCD-West = 3 OCRE
Stoney Creek (ON) LCD-3 = 3 OCRE
St Catharines (ON) LCD-1 & LCD-2 = 3 OCRE
Woodstock (ON) LCD-Main = 2 OCRE
Mount Forest (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Wingham (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Windsor (ON) LCD-4 = 1 OCRE
Kitchener (ON) LCD-Waterloo = 4 OCRE
Richmond Hill (ON) STN-A = 11 OCRE
Uxbridge (ON) Main = 2 OCRE
Toronto (ON) Malvern (LCD-4) = 2 OCRE
Pickering (ON) Main = 5 OCRE
Alliston (ON) Main = 2 OCRE
Georgetown (ON) Main = 3 OCRE

 

Prairie Region – CUPW

Winnipeg (MB) LCD-G = 2 OCRE
Winnipeg (MB) LCD-T (Transcona, LCD-E) = 5 OCRE
Winnipeg (MB) LCD-South-West = 5 OCRE
Winnipeg (MB) St-Vital = 4 OCRE
Saskatoon (SK) LCD-Main = 7 OCRE
Calgary (AB) CMPP (LCD-1 & LCD-9) = 1 OCRE
Edmonton (AB) LCD-2 = 3 OCRE
Fort Saskatchewan (AB) Main = 2 OCRE
Winfield (AB) PO = 1 OCRE

 

Pacific Region – CUPW

Quesnel (BC) Main = 1 OCRE
Vernon Station (BC) Main = 2 OCRE
Salmon Arm (BC) Main = 2 OCRE
Parksville (BC) Main = 2 OCRE
Courtenay (BC) Main = 2 OCRE
Gibsons (BC) PO = 1 OCRE
Sooke (BC) Main = 1 OCRE
Victoria (BC) LCD-10 = 1 OCRE
Victoria (BC) LCD-4 = 2 OCRE
Port Coquitlam (BC) Main = 4 OCRE
Delta (BC) Main = 1 OCRE

 

Seven (7) postal installations with less than six routes  maintain existing positions –

Lévis (QC-QUÉ) Lévis = 1 OCRE
Québec (QC-QUÉ) PDF-Charlesbourg (Loretteville) = 1 OCRE
St-Bruno (QC-MTL) SBC = 1 OCRE
Port Elgin (ON-CTL) PO = 1 OCRE
Glencoe (ON-ONT) PO = 1 OCRE
Kitchener (ON-ONT) LCD-Preston = 1 OCRE
Kelowna (BC-PAC) Rutland = 1 OCRE


Appendix 'E', paragraph 5 states that the ranking date of OCREs is determined by their last hiring date, and that if more than one employee has the same hiring date, the random number system is used to determine their ranking on the seniority list. The Corporation is required to produce local lists of OCREs by seniority rank.

The continuous service and seniority of an OCRE who has applied for and obtained a permanent relief employee (PRE) position or an RSMC position start as of his or her last date of hire and last date of entry into the bargaining unit. The Corporation is currently refusing to recognize the continuous service and seniority of OCREs who are promoted to an RSMC or PRE position.

The Union has filed a national grievance (N00-11 -R0008), which is scheduled to be heard on September 4, 2013. If a newly-promoted OCRE's continuous service and seniority are not being recognized by local management, please file an individual grievance and send us the information for inclusion in the national grievance.

In solidarity,

Philippe Arbour
National Grievance Officer

bul_2011-2015-187_eOncall rel pos RSMC 3-in PDF

 

 

RSMC Vehicle Types

July 31, 2013  

RSMC / Bulletin

2011-2015/188

On April 14, 2010, Canada Post advised the Union that it intended to change the requirements for the types of vehicle to be used on vacant RSMC routes. The employer’s rationale was conveyed to us at the national consultation meeting held on June 17, 2010. Canada Post alleged that RMB delivery through the passenger window was a health and safety hazard. It also claimed that there were operational reasons related to future business needs such as delivery agreements like the one between Canada Post and Fedex Ground Canada.

The Union considered this to be a breach of the provisions of the collective agreement and particularly clause 32.01 which states that:

‘’This obligation shall be maintained until the nature of the work to be performed or the situation has changed.’’

The Union was of the opinion that this would not resolve the ergonomic problems regarding the delivery to RMBs and that the Corporation could not change the vehicle type requirements because of the wording of clause 32.01. There was no change in situation, as indicated in clause 32.01, so the Union filed a national policy grievance (N00-08-R0017).

CPC then advised the Union that it intended to introduce corporate right-hand drive vehicles on some RSMC routes that were delivering to RMBs, and a reaching device on some other routes also delivering to RMBs. We entered into negotiations under Article 35 of the collective agreement, which deals with technological changes. The Corporation intended to roll out all of these changes, and then do an ergonomic study of the reaching device, if needed.

Finally, an agreement was reached to have a joint ergonomic study conducted by an independent provider, and the firm Golder Associates was selected. From the beginning of the study, Golder Associates had told the parties that, as indicated in their observations and conclusions, some of the determining factors in using the tool safely related to the width and height of the vehicle and to the height of the RMBs.  

After further review, the Union realized that while the arguments put forward in the national policy grievance (N00-08-R0017) might have been valid at the time the grievance was filed, the situation had since changed. One of the main challenges that RSMCs were facing was to find a vehicle that did not have obstructions, such as a console, between the front seats. The use of the reaching device, if deemed safe to use, and the use of right-hand drive vehicles would remove that requirement. We resolved the grievance while negotiating under the technological change provisions (Article 35) of the RSMC collective agreement.

During the ergonomic study, the Union realized that a substantial number of RSMCs were not using the types of vehicle required under the Schedule “A” of the Mail Transportation and Delivery Agreement for their route. This would have also put many RSMCs in a difficult position if the Corporation had decided to enforce the vehicle-type requirements. The MOA signed by the parties on June 5, 2013 addresses that issue and allows RSMCs to use the vehicle currently utilized on the date of signing of the MOA even if this is not reflected in their Schedule “A,” and until the RSMC changes his or her vehicle or willingly changes routes.

After the signing of the MOA, the Corporation provided us with a draft letter to the RSMCs in which it set out the new requirements for the types of vehicle, one being that all vehicles needed to be hatch-backs, which would then again seriously limit the choices available to RSMCs when buying a new vehicle. The Union was successful in having the Corporation rescind that requirement from the letter.

At the recommendation of Golder Associates, CPC is currently modifying the reaching device and the holder. These new components and work methods will then be tested and assessed by Golder Associates. The Union will keep a close eye on this situation and continue to negotiate with a view to eliminating any adverse effects on workers.

In solidarity,

Carl Girouard
National Union Representative - Grievances (French)

bul_2011-2015-188_RSMC Vehicle types-in PDF

 

New Positions – On-Call Relief Employees in Postal Installations with Six (6) or More RSMC Routes - #2

July 31, 2013  

Staffing / Bulletin

2011-2015/185

Implementation

As of January 1, 2014, the Corporation agrees, under Appendix 'E' of the RSMC collective agreement, to create and implement on-call relief employee (OCRE) positions to primarily, but not exclusively, cover vacation leave absences in all postal installations across the country with six (6) or more RSMC routes. In postal installations with permanent relief employees (PRE), the Corporation must first use these employees to cover vacation leave absences and then use PREs and OCREs to cover other absences.

As of January 1, 2014, under Appendix 'H' of the RSMC collective agreement, the Corporation will be responsible for covering all types of absences in installations with six (6) or more RSMC routes.

Rights and benefits

As stipulated in Appendix 'E', paragraph 11, all national memoranda of agreement regarding on-call relief employees are rendered null and void. The rights and benefits outlined in these memoranda of agreement have been incorporated into the different provisions of Appendix 'E', as well as various articles of the collective agreement (e.g. art. 8, 11, 12 …).  Appendix 'E', paragraph 9, states that the collective agreement applies to OCREs, except for the provisions listed. In addition, paragraph 5 states that the ranking date of OCREs is determined by their last hiring date, and that if more than one employee has the same hiring date, the random number system is used to determine their ranking on the seniority list. The Corporation is required to produce local lists of OCREs by seniority rank.

Postal installations with six (6) routes or more are entitled to On-Call Relief Employees (OCRE) – Creation of 193 positions:

 

Atlantic Region – CUPW

Grand Falls/Grand-Sault (NB) Main = 1 OCRE
Sussex (NB) Main = 1 OCRE
St-John's (NL) Main (comprend Portugal Cove, St-Phillips, Torbay, Goulds) = 2 OCRE
St-John's (NL) Manuels Main = 1 OCRE
St-John's (NL) Paradise Main = 1 OCRE
Bridgewater (NS) Main = 1 OCRE
Sydney (NS) Main = 2 OCRE
Antigonish (NS) Main = 1 OCRE
Amherst (NS) Main = 1 OCRE
Truro (NS) Main = 2 OCRE
Yarmouth (NS) Main = 1 OCRE

 

Quebec Region – CUPW

Gatineau (QC) Masson-Angers = 1 OCRE
Gatineau (QC) PDF Aylmer = 2 OCRE
Rimouski (QC) PDF Rimouski = 1 OCRE
Thetford Mines (QC) SBC = 2 OCRE
St-Jean-Chrysostome (QC) SBC = 2 OCRE
St-Nicolas (QC) SBC = 2 OCRE
Bécancour (QC) SBC = 1 OCRE
Trois-Rivières (QC) PDF-1 = 2 OCRE
Québec (QC) PDF Auvergne-1 = 1 OCRE
Pont-Rouge (QC) (Donacona, Cap Santé, St-Basile De Portneuf, Ste-Catherine De La Jc, St-Raymond) = 1OCRE
Québec (QC) Val-Bélair = 2 OCRE
St-Augustin-De-Desmaures (QC) = 2 OCRE
St-Raymond (QC) SBC = 1 OCRE
Dolbeau-Mistassini (QC) SBC = 1 OCRE
Amos (QC) SBC = 1 OCRE
Rouyn-Noranda (QC) SBC = 1 OCRE
St-Hyacinthe (QC) Succ. (St-Valérien De Milton, St-Dominique) = 1 OCRE
Drummondville (QC) SBC = 1 OCRE
Nicolet (QC) SBC = 1 OCRE
Waterloo (QC) BDP = 1 OCRE
Magog (QC) SBC = 2 OCRE
St-Jean-Sur-Richelieu (QC) Succ. St-Luc = 2OCRE
St-Lazare (QC) SBC = 2 OCRE
Joliette (QC) SBC = 1 OCRE
Mont-Laurier (QC) SBC = 1 OCRE
Mont-Tremblant (QC) Principale = 1 OCRE
Rawdon (QC) BDP = 1 OCRE
Ste-Agathe-Des-Monts (QC) = 2 OCRE
Ste-Sophie (QC) SBC = 1 OCRE
St-Jérôme (QC) Bellefeuille = 1 OCRE
St-Lin-Laurentides (QC) SBC = 1 OCRE
St-Sauveur (QC) BDP = 1 OCRE

 

Metro-Montreal Region – CUPW

Chambly (QC) SBC = 1 OCRE

 

Metro-Toronto Region – CUPW

None

 

Central Region – CUPW

Belleville (ON) Main = 2 OCRE
Brighton (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Cobourg (ON) Main = 2 OCRE
Napanee (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Stirling (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Almonte (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Arnprior (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Carleton Place (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Kemptville (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Perth (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Kingston (ON) Stn-A = 1 OCRE
Pembroke (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Bancroft (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Lakefield (ON) PO = 2 OCRE
Lindsay (ON) Main = 2 OCRE
Woodville (ON) PO = 2 OCRE
Angus (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Collingwood (ON) LCD-Collingwood = 1 OCRE
Meaford (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Oro (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Owen Sound (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Wasaga Beach (ON) Main = 2 OCRE
Wiarton (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Bracebridge (ON) Main = 2 OCRE
Huntsville (ON) Main = 2 OCRE
Orillia (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Penetanguishene (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
North Bay (ON) Main = 2 OCRE
Sault Ste. Marie (ON) Main = 2 OCRE
Hanmer (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Sudbury  (ON) LCD-Main = 1 OCRE
Ottawa  (ON) LCD-S = 1 OCRE

 

Pacific Region – CUPW

Mission (BC) Main = 1 OCRE
Lake Country (BC) Main = 1 OCRE
Creston (BC) PO = 1 OCRE
Armstrong (BC) PO = 1 OCRE
Kamloops (BC) Del Ctr = 1 OCRE
Whitehorse (YT) Main = 1 OCRE
Cobble Hill (BC) PO = 1 OCRE
Duncan (BC) Main = 1 OCRE
Qualicum Beach (BC) Main = 1 OCRE
Salt Spring Island (BC) Ganges = 1 OCRE
Sechelt (BC) PO = 1 OCRE
Whistler (BC) PO = 1 OCRE

 

Ontario Region – CUPW

Binbrook (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Smithville (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Welland (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Niagara Falls (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Niagara On The Lake (ON) PO = 2 OCRE
London-Lambeth (ON) (Delaware) = 1 OCRE
Dutton (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Ingersoll (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
St Thomas (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Strathroy (ON) Main = 2 OCRE
Tillsonburg (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Belle River (ON) PO = 2 OCRE
Chatham (ON) Main = 2 OCRE
Sarnia (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Thamesville (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Clinton (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Goderich (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Kincardine (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Mitchell (ON) PO = 2 OCRE
New Hamburg (ON) Main = 2 OCRE
St Marys (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Millbrook (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Port Hope (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Sutton West (ON) PO = 1 OCRE
Acton (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Bradford (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
King City (ON) Main = 1 OCRE
Shelburne (ON) PO = 1 OCRE

 

Prairie Region – CUPW

Brandon (MB) Main = 1 OCRE
Dugald (MB) PO = 1 OCRE
Selkirk (MB) Main = 1 OCRE
Steinbach (MB) Main = 1 OCRE
Canmore (AB) Main = 2 OCRE
Cochrane (AB) Main = 2 OCRE
High River (AB) Main = 2 OCRE
Medicine Hat (AB) LCD-1 = 2 OCRE
Taber (AB) Main = 2 OCRE
Brooks (AB) Main = 1 OCRE
Innisfail (AB) Main = 2 OCRE
Olds (AB) Main = 2 OCRE
Rocky Mountain House (AB) Main = 2 OCRE
Strathmore (AB) Main = 2 OCRE
Cold Lake (AB) Main = 1 OCRE
Barrhead (AB) Main = 2 OCRE
Drayton Valley (AB) Main = 1 OCRE
Edson (AB) Main = 2 OCRE
Hinton (AB) Main = 1 OCRE
Morinville (AB) Main = 2 OCRE
Westlock (AB) Main = 1 OCRE
Camrose (AB) Main = 1 OCRE
Lacombe (AB) Main = 2 OCRE
Ponoka (AB) Main = 2 OCRE
Wainwright (AB) Main = 1 OCRE
Wetaskiwin (AB) Main = 2 OCRE
Lloydminster (SK) Main = 1 OCRE
Yellowknife (NT) LCD-Main = 2 OCRE
Prince Albert (SK) MPP = 1 OCRE

 

CUPW locals with postal installations that are using or will be required to use the services of on-call relief employees (OCREs) and all locals with postal installations that will be required to use permanent relief employees (PREs) will have to hold union-management meetings.

At these meetings, you must ensure that the Corporation hires a sufficient number of OCREs or PREs to cover all absences. You will also need to consult on the implementation of the annual leave schedule for the period of January 1st to December 31st, 2014 to ensure RSMCs can bid on their annual leave, and OCREs and PREs can bid on their assignments, as soon as possible. Please ensure the parties’ positions are clearly outlined in the consultation minutes.

Should you encounter any problems in dealing with CPC, please ask your CUPW regional office for assistance in finding solutions or determining whether a grievance is needed.

In solidarity,

Philippe Arbour
National Grievance Officer

bul_2011-2015-185_on call rel pos RSMC 2 -in PDF

 

Permanent relief employees in postal installations with more than 14 RSMC routes - #1

July 24, 2013  

Staffing / Bulletin

2011-2015/186

Implementation

As of January 1, 2014, the Corporation agrees, under Appendix "F" of the RSMC collective agreement, to create and implement permanent relief employee (PRE) positions to primarily, but not exclusively, cover vacation leave absences in all postal installations with fourteen (14) or more RSMC routes. The Corporation will become responsible for covering all types of absences by route holders working in installations with at least a minimum of six (6) RSMC routes. Permanent relief employees will be scheduled to work a minimum of twelve (12) hours per week and will be paid based on the activity values outlined in Appendix "A" of the RSMC collective agreement. In addition, permanent relief employees will receive the variable allowance for the route being replaced. Unless a corporate vehicle is provided, the appropriate vehicle expense will apply.

When a permanent relief employee is not assigned to a route and being paid, he or she will receive sixty dollars ($60.00) per day in compensation and be required to perform other RSMC duties assigned by the Corporation for a maximum of three (3) hours per day.

 

Rights and Benefits

In addition to the CPC Pension Plan, annual leave and the uniform entitlement, permanent relief employees will receive the same protections, rights and benefits as regular RSMC employees. 

Postal installations with more than 14 routes that are entitled to permanent relief employees (PRE) – Creation of 125 positions:
 

Atlantic Region – CUPW

  • FREDERICTON (NB) LCD-1 (includes Burtts Corner and Oromocto) = 2 PRE
  • SAINT JOHN (NB) STN-MAIN = 1 PRE
  • DARTMOUTH (NS) STN-EAST = 1 PRE

 

Quebec Region – CUPW

  • GATINEAU (QC) SBC = 1 PRE
  • GRANBY (QC) SBC = 1 PRE
  • SHERBROOKE (QC) SBC = 1 PRE
  • SAINT-JEROME (QC) SBC = 1 PRE
  • ST-JANVIER (QC) = 2 PRE

 

Metro-Montreal Region – CUPW

  • SAINT-EUSTACHE (QC) SBC = 1 PRE
  • TERREBONNE (QC) PDF-1 & PDF-2 = 2 PRE
  • BOUCHERVILLE (QC) SBC = 1 PRE
  • SAINTE-JULIE (QC) SBC = 1 PRE

   

Central Region – CUPW

  • STITTSVILLE (ON) STN-B = 1 PRE
  • BARRIE (ON) LCD DISTRIBUTION = 2 PRE
  • INNISFIL (ON) STN-MAIN = 1 PRE
  • THUNDER BAY (ON) STN-F & STN-P = 1 PRE
  • NEWMARKET (ON) LCD-1 = 2 PRE
  • ORLEANS (ON) STN-ORLEANS = 1 PRE
  • KANATA (ON) STN-KANATA = 1 PRE
  • NEPEAN (ON) LCD-N = 1 PRE

 

Pacific Region – CUPW

  • ABBOTSFORD (BC) STN-DEL CTR = 2 PRE
  • CHILLIWACK (BC) STN-MAIN = 2 PRE
  • MAPLE RIDGE (BC) STN-DEL CTR = 1 PRE
  • KELOWNA (BC) STN-OKANAGAN DC = 2 PRE
  • PRINCE (BC) GEORGE STN-B = 1 PRE
  • NANAIMO (BC) STN-MAIN = 1 PRE
  • SIDNEY (BC) LCD-DEL CTR = 1 PRE
  • LANGLEY (BC) STN-LCD-1 = 2 PRE
  • SURREY (BC) STN-A = 3 PRE

   

Metro-Toronto Region – CUPW

  • MISSISSAUGA (ON) LCD-4 & LCD-7 = 5 PRE
  • WOODBRIDGE (ON) STN-MAIN = 2 PRE
  • BRAMPTON (ON) LCD-3, LCD-4 (includes Caledon (ON) Stn-Main) = 7 PRE
  • BRAMPTON NORTH (ON) (includes Brampton (ON) STN-A & STN-B) = 3 PRE

 

Ontario Region – CUPW

  • KITCHENER (ON) LCD-3 = 1 PRE
  • KITCHENER (ON) LCD-GALT = 1 PRE
  • BRANTFORD (ON) STN-MAIN = 1 PRE
  • GUELPH (ON) LCD-ROYAL CITY MAIL = 2 PRE
  • BURLINGTON (ON) STN LCD-1 = 1 PRE
  • BURLINGTON (ON) STN LCD-8 = 1 PRE
  • LONDON LCD-1, 3, 4, 5 = 1 PRE
  • THORNHILL (ON) STN-MAIN (includes Unionville (ON) LCD-1) = 2 PRE
  • RICHMOND HILL (ON) LCD14 (includes Unionville (ON) LCD-2) = 6 PRE
  • BOWMANVILLE (ON) STN-MAIN = 2 PRE
  • PORT PERRY (ON) STN-MAIN = 1 PRE
  • STOUFFVILLE (ON) STN-MAIN = 1 PRE
  • AJAX (ON) STN-DELIVERY CENTRE = 3 PRE
  • OSHAWA (ON) STN-A (includes Oshawa (ON) LCD-Whitby) = 1 PRE
  • MAPLE (ON) STN-DELIVERY CENTRE = 2 PRE
  • ORANGEVILLE (ON) LCD-MAIN = 1 PRE
  • MILTON (ON) STN-MAIN = 2 PRE
  • OAKVILLE (ON) LCD-1 = 1 PRE
  • OAKVILLE (ON) STN-MAIN = 1 PRE

Prairie Region – CUPW

  • CALGARY (AB) NE SUNRIDGE DEPOT (includes LCD-6, 7, 15) = 2 PRE
  • CALGARY (AB) NW ROYAL OAK DEPOT (includes LCD-4, 11, 16, 23) = 8 PRE
  • CALGARY (AB) DEERFOOT SOUTH (includes LCD-8, 17, 18, 19) = 5 PRE
  • ST. ALBERT (AB) STN-MAIN = 1 PRE
  • EDMONTON (AB) LCD-4 & LCD8 = 2 PRE
  • EDMONTON (AB) LCD-DELTON = 1 PRE
  • SHERWOOD PARK (AB) STN-MAIN = 2 PRE
  • EDMONTON (AB) LCD-6 = 1 PRE
  • EDMONTON (AB) LCD-9 = 1 PRE
  • AIRDRIE (AB) STN-MAIN = 2 PRE
  • LETHBRIDGE (AB) STN-MAIN = 1 PRE
  • OKOTOKS (AB) STN-MAIN = 1 PRE
  • RED DEER (AB) LCD-1 = 2 PRE
  • FORT MCMURRAY (AB) STN-MAIN = 1 PRE
  • SPRUCE GROVE (AB) STN-MAIN = 2 PRE
  • GRANDE PRAIRIE (AB) STN-MAIN = 1 PRE
  • LEDUC (AB) STN-MAIN = 2 PRE
  • REGINA (SK) STN-MAIN (LCD-1, 2, 3) = 1 PRE
  • SASKATOON (SK) LCD-3 & LCD-1 = 1 PRE


 CUPW locals with postal installations that are using or will be required to use the services of on-call relief employees (OCREs) and all locals with postal installations that will be required to use permanent relief employees (PREs) will have to hold union-management meetings.

At these meetings, you must ensure that the Corporation hires a sufficient number of OCREs or PREs to cover all absences. You will also need to consult on the implementation of the annual leave schedule for the period of January 1st to December 31st, 2014 to ensure RSMCs can bid on their annual leave, and OCREs and PREs can bid on their assignments, as soon as possible. Please ensure the parties' positions are clearly outlined in the consultation minutes.

Should you encounter any problems in dealing with CPC, please ask your CUPW regional office for assistance in finding solutions or determining whether a grievance is needed.

In solidarity,

Philippe Arbour
National Grievance Officer

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New RSMC Contract Books Have Arrived

July 18, 2013

RSMC / Bulletin

2011-2015/172

Many locals and members have been asking when the contract books for the new RSMC collective agreements will be coming.

We have now received advance copies of the new RSMC contract books at National Office.  They should be available to members in the locals in approximately 2 weeks.

 

Employer Must Supply Contracts to Members

As per clause 31.02 of the contract, the employer is required to supply each member with a copy.  Make sure that you get your copy from your Su pervisor.   It has a navy blue cover to distinguish it from the old agreement.

 

Side Letters in Full Force and Effect

Some of the letters that were included in the package supplied for ratification votes are not in the actual contract.  These letters are still in full force and effect, and can be grieved as though they were part of the collective agreement.

A letter will be sent to local CUPW offices shortly with signed copies of these side letters attached.

It is also important to note that Appendix K (Right Hand Drive vehicles) has been adjusted and added to by the Memorandum of Agreement between CUPW and Canada Post signed June 5, 2013 under Article 35 of the collective agreement (Technological Change).  This Memorandum was sent to the locals on June 5, 2013.

 

Thanks to Your Negotiating Committee

While this collective agreement does not address all issues of concern to RSMCs, it does provide major improvements in the working lives of RSMC members.

At this time, I would once again like to thank the members of the RSMC Negotiating Committee who came to Ottawa, spending many months away from their homes and families, and took on the hard work of negotiating this collective agreement on behalf of the members:

  • Nancy Beauchamp, Montreal Local
  • Barbara McMillan, Arnprior-Renfrew Local
  • Shelley Sillers, Guelph Local
  • Susan Wilson, Edmonton Local

I would also like to thank Brothers Ken Bird, Geoff Bickerton, and Colin MacKenzie for the assistance that they gave to the Negotiating Committee.  Administrative Assistants Jackie Morris and Lise King and the staff of the national office translation department deserve thanks for their important support work.  Without their hard work and dedication, it would not have been possible to achieve this collective agreement.

In solidarity,

Donald Lafleur
4th National Vice-President

bul_2011-2015-172_New RSMC contracts-in PDF

 

 

RSMC Time Values

2011-2015 / Bulletin no. 181

 

July 11, 2013

With the implementation of the Right Hand Drive (RHD) vehicles and the RSMC Reaching
Device (RRD), the parties have had to look at the time allotted to deliver mail to Rural Mail
Box (RMB) using these 2 new work methods.

The parties had a joint ergonomic study done by Golder Associates, an engineering firm. The
time values they developed, which were also verified by the union, are 0.15 minutes (9
seconds) for the RHD and 0.37 minutes (22.2 seconds) for the RRD. The compensation model
amounts are reproduced below.

 

The existing standard when delivering from a left hand drive vehicle is 0.28 of a minute (16.8
seconds). This Route Management System (RMS) time was converted to a monetary amount
under the compensation model found in Appendix A. Those monetary amounts (cents per
duty) are listed below and can be found in Appendix A.


The time values were converted from time to per piece payments by doing the following
calculations. I will only do the math for one example in Zone 2 and the present RMB
delivery. The same calculations can be made for all items found in the compensation model,
including the newly agreed to RHD and RRD. The multiplier for Zone 1 in 2013 is $18.50 an
hour and $21.28 for Zone 3.

As can be seen, time values and an hourly rate are clearly needed to make sense of the
compensation model. Unfortunately, CPC refused to make things simple during
negotiations. There is no doubt we have set the stage for future rounds of negotiations.

The time value converted to the compensation model per piece payments was reduced for
the RHD delivery and increased for the RRD during delivery. Presently all RSMC are
evaluated as if they were all delivering across the seat out the passenger window; therefore,
delivering from a RHD vehicle will take less time and that is what is reflected in the time
value and the compensation model. On the contrary, the time studies done by both parties
reflect that the use of the RRD takes more time than passing the mail through the passenger
side window by hand, so that is also reflected in the amounts found under the compensation
model.

As you may know the parties have negotiated a Sortation and Delivery Value Study in
Letter 3 of the RSMC collective agreement. The RHD and RRD time values will be jointly
revisited in 2014.

An RSMC Collective Agreement course is available, which was facilitated in all 8 Regions last
Spring. This course can be facilitated at the Local level as well.

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Solidarité,

Donald Lafleur

4th National Vice-President

2011-2015 / Bulletin no.181

Bulletin 181E_RSMC Time Values_07-11-2013


 

Non-Delivery of Routes – RSMC and Urban

June 27, 2013  

Staffing / Bulletin

2011-2015/176

As workers we have been facing ongoing worldwide attacks by the ruling class and their puppet governments for years now.  Postal workers are no exception as multinational corporations force governments to create crisis after crisis in their efforts to destroy public services so they can pick up the profitable pieces, bust unions and weaken our fragile democracies.

With all the forced overtime and lack of proper staffing, many routes in both urban and rural delivery areas do not get delivered every day.  The Canadian Postal Service Charter, part 6, reads as follows:

 

Frequent and Reliable Delivery

  1. Canada Post will deliver letters, parcels and publications five days a week (except for statutory holidays) to every Canadian address, except in remote areas where less frequent service may be necessary due to limited access to the community.

 

At its latest meeting the NEB discussed the March 2013 National Work Measurement Committee’s recommendations.  Relating to this particular issue, the NEB recommended that letters be sent to municipal governments each time Canada Post does not comply with the service charter.  A letter to the Local Presidents, along with the sample letter to municipal governments, was recently sent out. What is key here is that members take the time to ensure the customers who did not get their mail receive a copy of these letters, and that they be encouraged to also write letters and take action in their communities.

Remember there is a mandate review of the Canadian Postal Service Charter coming in 2014. We need to ensure the public and our allies are informed and involved in this process.

 

We will maintain door-to-door delivery and 5-day a week delivery, but we must struggle as we have in the past to achieve that goal.

In solidarity,

Donald Lafleur
4th National Vice-President

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Memorandum of Agreement on the RSMC Suite of Products and Right-Hand Drive Vehicles

June 11, 2013

RSMC / Bulletin

2011-2015/171

After nearly one year of meetings and discussions, CUPW and Canada Post signed a memorandum of agreement on June 5, 2013 regarding the introduction of the RSMC suite of products, and on an addendum to the MOA signed on October 5, 2012 regarding the introduction of right-hand drive vehicles (RHD). These negotiations took place under Article 35 of the RSMC collective agreement, which deals with technological changes. The Union not only had to identify the adverse effects resulting from the introduction of the RSMC products and RHD vehicles, but it also had to ensure these adverse effects for all employees were minimized.

The memorandum of agreement includes the following highlights:

  • RSMC Products

    • RSMC Reaching Device (RRD): The parties agree that Canada Post will modify the existing RRD in an attempt to reduce the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) score. Once modified, the RRD will be jointly tested with Golder Associates. The Corporation undertakes to develop a second generation RRD system. This second generation will also be tested jointly with this same firm

    • Accommodation: In the event of injuries, the Corporation shall accommodate the employee in accordance with the collective agreement. The Union will be represented by the CUPW National Director for the Region.

    • Training: The Corporation will make every reasonable effort to reach an agreement with the Union regarding the development of the training material, peer trainer selection and the train-the-trainer process.

  • Right-Hand Drive Vehicles: Employees who choose to buy, retrofit or modify their vehicle as a RHD vehicle will receive special allowances in accordance with the terms related to special allowances under Appendix “A” of the collective agreement, in addition to the special allowances outlined in the memoranda of agreement.
  • Vehicle Specifications: The parties have agreed to a number of principles regarding vehicle specifications, special allowances under the collective agreement and values for delivery to rural mail boxes (RMB), using the RRD or a RHD vehicle.
  • Restructures: The parties have agreed to extend the period that a laid-off employee remains on the recall list to 24 months, rather than the current 12 months under the collective agreement. Such employees will be offered any vacant position that arises within a 75 km radius from their current installation.

This memorandum of agreement settles all matters brought to the table by the Union that have been agreed upon. However, the parties agree to re-open negotiations under Article 35 of the collective agreement should issues arise that are not covered or are unforeseen by the memorandum of agreement.

Additional information regarding this memorandum of agreement will be sent to you in the near future.

In collaboration with Carl Girouard, Chris Pleasants et Francis Bénard.

In solidarity,

Serge Champoux
National Union Representative - Health and Safety

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Become a RSMC peer trainer

June 5, 2013

Education / Bulletin

 

2011-2015/164

The union has always considered that the members who have the best knowledge of the work are the ones who perform it every day.  Peer training is a unique opportunity for members to share their knowledge of the work as well as their experience for the benefit of new employees.

CUPW is looking for RSMC members who would like to be facilitators. This responsibility consists of delivering training to your Sisters and Brothers on the work floor. The training would include work methods and the use of the reaching device (RRD) for mail delivery to rural mailboxes.

Facilitators called upon to provide the training will be compensated the higher of either one hundred and thirty-five (135) dollars per day or their daily wage for any day of training related to the RRD system, less statutory deductions. The Canada Post Travel Policy for Unionized Employees will be applied.

As a facilitator, you might be required to travel between offices in your region. Those who are interested should be readily available, be good communicators and have the ability to convey information effectively.

If interested, please contact your union representative or your local and leave your contact information (name, employee number, postal address, route name and post office).

In solidarity,

Serge Champoux
National Union Representative - Health and Safety

bul_2011-2015_164-Become a RSMC Peer Trainer-in PDF


 

Mandatory Security Screening Policy for URBAN and RSMC

March 27, 2013

Canada Post / Bulletin

2011-2015/151

 

During National consultation Canada Post (CPC) stated they were looking at implementing a new practice for security for personnel.

CUPW inquired as to why CPC wanted to implement this new policy? CPC stated “To ensure that we maintain the confidence of our customers through a secure mail stream, a safe work environment for all employees and a quality workforce”. CUPW informed CPC that we were opposed to this new policy and we would be reviewing our options as there is no legislated or regulated requirements for Canada Post to security screen its employee’s.

This new policy would allow Canada Post to security screen all current employees every 10 years with the flexibility to change the frequency of security screening to any time frame Canada Post desires.

CPC will require all employees to sign a consent form which provides CPC with permission to security screen its employees. If you refuse to sign this form CPC will start progressive discipline, up to termination.

If an employee has a criminal record Canada Post will then require that employee to be fingerprinted. The results from the fingerprinting will provide Canada Post with the following information; what the conviction was for, when it happened and what the outcome of the conviction was. Canada Post will provide a letter requesting a “resolution of doubt interview” with this employee, where they will be required to explain the details surrounding their conviction. All information gathered would be provided to the General Manager of Security and Investigation, who will then decide if this employee has “reliability status”.  The General Manager of Security and Investigation will inform CPC of their decision. If it is decided that they do not have “reliability status” they will be terminated from employment. Canada Post would expect that all employees will maintain “reliability status” as a requirement of their employment.

Canada Post informed us that they will start implementing this new policy on April 29th, 2013 in Prince Edward Island. CPC stated they were not starting, East to West or West to East but looking at smaller populated provinces first.

CUPW is opposed to this new policy and we are reviewing all our options. We will advise you in the near future on how we are going to proceed.

In solidarity,

Rona Eckert
National Union representative - Consultation

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RSMC Routes Must Be Covered Every Day

February 20, 2013  

Staffing / Bulletin

2011-2015/141

CUPW has been receiving many reports from coast-to-coast that some RSMC routes are not being covered on a regular basis.

The Union’s position is that every RSMC route must be covered every day.  Unlike in the Urban Unit, the Collective Agreement does not specifically say this.  However, the Canada Post Service Charter states, “Canada Post will deliver letters, parcels and publications 5 days a week (except for statutory holidays) to every Canadian address, except in remote areas where less frequent service may be necessary due to limited access to the community.”

 

Vacant Routes, OCRE Positions

Why is this happening?  In many cases, vacant routes or On Call Relief (OCRE) positions may be the reason.  According to information received from Canada Post in January 2013, there were 213 vacant routes.  Out of 709 OCRE positions, 121 were vacant.  Some of these routes and OCRE positions had been vacant for many months and in some cases for more than a year.

If a route is vacant, there is no route holder to find a replacement where that is required.  If an OCRE position is vacant, there is no one available to cover vacation leave of route holders as provided for in the contract.

 

Changes in New Contract

The new contract contains a number of new provisions for coverage of absences:

  • In offices with 14 or more routes, permanent relief jobs will be established. (Appendix F, or New 7 in draft contract)

  • Offices of 6 or more routes will be required to have OCREs.  This would include offices of 14 routes or more. (Appendix E)

  • In offices of 6 or more routes, the employer will be responsible for covering all absences provided for in the Collective Agreement. (Appendix H, or New 8 in draft agreement)

However, these changes do not take place until January 1, 2014.

 

RSMCs Can Cover Other Routes

One change does take effect immediately.  Clause 13.03 provides for one route holder covering all or part of another RSMC route, paid as per the new RSMC compensation model. 

The employer is not required to use clause 13.03, but if the route would otherwise be left uncovered, they are required to have the mail delivered within the bargaining unit, by replacements, and by CUPW members.

 

Grieve Non-Coverage, Vacancies

If members are aware that a RSMC route was not covered, they should contact their local CUPW office, and file a grievance.  Locals should grieve this situation every time it occurs.  If other route holders were not offered extra work, or if an OCRE was sitting at home waiting to be called to work, ask that a route holder(s) or OCRE be paid for the evaluated time of the uncovered route.  Grievances should refer to the Canada Post Service Charter, as cited above.

Locals could also write their local Members of Parliament, informing them of CPC’s Charter violations.  If you do so, please copy the undersigned at the CUPW

National Office, your Regional Office, as well as Opposition postal critics, the CPC Ombudsman, Canadian Labour Congress, your provincial federation of labour, and your local labour council.

 

Grieve Vacant Routes and OCRE Positions

Locals should also press the employer to fill vacant routes and OCRE positions.  If the employer does not fill the job within a reasonable period of time, file a staffing grievance.

In some locations, the employer has not staffed positions, but has hired an external contractor instead.  CUPW believes that this violates Article 28 – work in the bargaining unit.  In addition to filing grievances, members and locals should approach the contractors and ask if they want to become CPC employees.  If they say yes, include this information in grievance files.

A package regarding RSMC staffing will be sent to all locals in the near future.

RSMCs deserve to take the leave that they are entitled to without fear of discipline or that their customers will not receive their mail while the RSMC returns to an unreasonable volume of mail.

In solidarity,

Donald Lafleur
4th National Vice-President

bul_2011-2015-141_RSMC routes covered -in PDF

 

Annual Boot Allowance – Arbitration Win for RSMCs & OCREs

February 13, 2013  

Grievance and Arbitration / Bulletin

2011-2015/140

Canada Post violated our rights

In January 2009, Canada Post, acting unilaterally, refused to pay the annual boot allowance to RSMC and OCREs on leave without pay, thus violating our rights under the collective agreement. It repeated this unilateral action in 2010, 2011 and 2012.

 

Past practice

All RSMC and OCRE employees on strength on January 1st, 2007 and on January 1st, 2008 received the boot allowance, whether or not they were considered by the employer to be active, inactive or on call. The allowance was paid out by January 31st.

 

Union defense of your rights

Based on a faulty interpretation of the collective agreement, Canada Post stubbornly refused to respect our rights and enforce the collective agreement. As a result, the Union filed a national grievance (N00-08-R0007) and an arbitration hearing took place on February 9, 2011.

 

Arbitration decision

On January 24, 2013, the arbitrator rendered a decision in favour of the Union. The following is an excerpt from his decision:

“…A plain and ordinary reading of the language of Article 24.03 reveals clear language, which on its face provides that all RSMC employees are to be paid the boot allowance. The collective agreement contains a definition of “employee” in Article 29.01, as any employee as defined under the Canada Labour Code and who is included in the bargaining unit.”

“…There is no language in Article 24.03, or indeed anywhere in the collective agreement, which draws a distinction between active and inactive employees; indeed, this distinction appears to be one created entirely by the Corporation’s payroll system, and there was no evidence that the parties have agreed to a definition of “inactive” status, or to any differential treatment of employees on unpaid leave and thus considered by the Corporation to be inactive.”

“…Certainly it is clear that there is no source for a negotiated definition of “inactive” which could support the claim that the parties intended to exclude this particular category of employees from the coverage of Article 24.03, either in the clause itself, or elsewhere in the collective agreement. In order to give meaning to the words negotiated, and considering the context of the collective agreement as a whole, I must conclude that all RSMC employees, regardless of their status, are entitled to the boot allowance.”

“…The grievance is allowed. I shall remain seized to deal with any issues as to the implementation of this award.”

 

RSMCs’ annual boot allowance

The amount of the boot allowance RSMCs are entitled to is based on the number of daily work hours scheduled under the RSMC-RMS as of January 1st, multiplied by thirty dollars ($30.00), to a yearly maximum of two hundred and forty dollars ($240.00). This formula is to be applied for each of the years 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012.

 

OCREs’ annual boot allowance

Unlike RSMCs, on-call relief employees (OCREs) are entitled to receive the entire amount of the boot allowance, i.e. one hundred and eighty dollars ($180.00) per year.

 

Eligibility for payment

Anyone working for CPC as an RSMC or an OCRE who, on January 1st, 2009, 2010, 2011 and/or 2012, was considered inactive or on call and who did not receive the entire annual boot allowance owed to them is eligible for the payment. We will be meeting with Canada Post to ensure that the affected RSMCs and OCREs are paid promptly.


If you are affected by this decision, please advise your union representative. The local will then forward us the relevant information.

In solidarity,

Philippe Arbour
National Grievance Officer

bul_2011-2015-140_RSMC Arb Win for Boot and Glove-in PDF

 

Apply Now to Ensure Extended Health Care Coverage

 

 

February 7, 2013  

Benefits / Bulletin

2011-2015/137

One of the most significant steps forward in the new RSMC collective agreement is the inclusion of RSMCs in the Canada Post Extended Health Care Plan (EHCP).

Coverage for drugs is now included in the EHCP in addition to hospital coverage and a number of different paramedical expenses such as acupuncture, chiropractor, electrologist, massage therapy, midwife, naturopathic, osteopathic, physiotherapy, podiatrist, psychology,  social work, and speech therapy treatments.

 

RSMCs Must Apply for Coverage

It is very important that RSMCs understand that to be covered by the EHCP, you must submit an application.  Canada Post (CPC)’s ongoing policy will be that the coverage will be effective the day that CPC receives your application.  However, because the Plan was in effect starting January 1, 2013 and because it is new for RSMCs, if you submit your application by February 15, 2013, you will be covered retroactive to January 1, 2013.

According to Canada Post, if you were previously enrolled in the Controlled Drug Plan, you do not have to fill out a new application unless you wish to take advantage of the optional additional hospital coverage.  There is a small fee for this additional hospital coverage.

 

All RSMCs Eligible for EHCP

All RSMCs will be included the EHCP, except that those who hold routes with less than 12 hours will not be covered by the controlled drug portion of the plan.  This exclusion is a carryover from the 2011 contract, when these members were not included in the separate Controlled Drug Plan.

Some RSMCs may move from, or obtain a route of less than 12 hours.  CPC is still working out how it will administer the plan in this respect.  However, the Corporation did say that a 12 month waiting period will no longer apply when resuming coverage, and that as a matter of course, they won’t terminate coverage until the end of the month.  Anyone in this situation should keep their drug receipts and apply for reimbursement.

 

If in Doubt, Apply

If in doubt as to whether you need to fill out a new application, do so.  The Corporation said that they have mailed information packages to all members’ homes.  If you did not receive one, see your Supervisor.  If there is still a problem contact your shop steward.

Remember that you must apply to receive this important benefit.  According to CPC, some 1,300 eligible members did not apply for the controlled drug plan.

In solidarity,

Donald Lafleur
4th National Vice-President

bul_2011-2015-137-RSMC apply now for coverage-in PDF

 

 

Changes to Route Management System (RMS) Introduced with New RSMC Compensation Model

 

January 31, 2013  

RSMC / Bulletin

2011-2015/134

The new compensation model for RSMCs was implemented on January 24, 2013.  The new model provides for a more standardized pay system than was the case in the past.  Some 7,000 rates of pay have been reduced to 15 rates of pay based on work location and RSMC seniority level, except where an employee’s pay has been red-circled.

 

RMS Changes

The “activity component” of the new model is based on the RSMC Route Management System (RMS) time values and the new wage rates.  Along with the new model, there are some changes to the RMS:

  • Time values for sortation and delivery are now separated into inside and outside duties.

  • Driving time is now assigned a time value based on the vehicle’s driving speed.  There are two speeds, one (1.2 min. per km at 50 km/hr.) where there is an average of two or fewer stops per kilometer and one where the average number of stops per kilometer exceeds two (1.5 min. per km at 40 km/hr.).

  • All points of call designated as business calls will be credited with business sortation time, regardless of receptacle type.  Delivery values will depend on the delivery method.

  • Apartments are now separated from houses and will receive a reduced sortation value.

  • Stops will now be calculated based on the exact number of delivery stops.

  • The separate time value for knowledge sort has been removed.  Time for this work is included in the sortation credits for each point of call type, and is generally less time than was previously given. 

 

Overall Increase in Time Credits

According to the most recent estimates from CPC, there is an overall increase of 77,905 hours to RSMC routesHowever, there will be considerable variation from route to route.  Some routes will have a decrease in time and monetary credit.  On other routes there will be an increase.  The gains are in the business sortation credit and the driving time. RSMCs will lose time on the other changes. 

If there were sudden changes to the route as of January 24, these RMS changes are the most likely reason.  Members should demand a copy of the revised Schedule A so that they can verify that the correct numbers of calls of each type are credited, and that the driving speed is correct.  In particular, business points of call are not always correctly identified.  If the employer refuses to provide the new Schedule A, contact your shop steward or local CUPW office.

 

Knowledge Sort and Civic Addressing Allowance

The new knowledge sort and civic addressing allowance is a partial replacement for the knowledge sort time values that were formerly in the RMS.  This allowance is described in Appendix A, paragraph 4 of the new contract.

In general, the employer plans to phase out knowledge sort and to provide every point of call with a civic address.  In the interim, the following will apply:

  • Where a route has knowledge sort points of call, the employee performing the sortation will receive $.05 per day for each of these knowledge sort calls.  This entitlement will apply for the first 3 months that a RSMC is on the route.  It will also apply whenever a permanent relief employee or OCRE is on the route, unless the relief employee has been covering a long term absence for more than 3 months.  The concept is that after a certain period of time, the regular route holder will know the case and be able to sort it without requiring additional time.

  • Where a point of call is assigned a civic address and no longer requires knowledge sort, the route holder or relief employee covering the route shall receive $.05 per point of call converted per day for a 6 month period, provided that the Corporation provides complimentary redirection to the affected customers.

If there are any questions or any problems with this implementation, call your local CUPW office.

In solidarity,

Donald Lafleur
4th National Vice-President

bul_2011-2015-134-RSMC changes to RMS -in PDF

 

 

 

January 22, 2013

NEW RSMC COMPENSATION MODEL IMPLEMENTED JANUARY 24

 

 

A number of regional and local offices received notices last week indicating that there would be a RSMC restructure in one of their installations.

As members are aware, the new collective agreement says that a new compensation model will be established for RSMCs effective January 1, 2013. However, during negotiations, Canada Post told CUPW that because of software issues, the model would not actually be implemented until sometime later.

Any monies owing to members would be paid retroactive to January 1 2013.

Restructures on Hold Until Model Implemented

When the restructure notices started to appear, CUPW was concerned that if restructures were started prior to the actual implementation of the new compensation model, there would be numerous problems. It was not clear that locals and members would receive proper information about the new routes, about which members’ rate of pay would be red-circled, and about whether or not proper information would be available for bidding.

At a meeting held on January 17, 2013, the employer informed CUPW that the new compensation model will be implemented on January 24, 2013. The employer has agreed to hold off on starting restructures until after that date so that all restructures can be done under the new model.

The notices received by regions and locals are notices under paragraph 11.04 a) of the new contract advising the Union that work on a restructure will start in 30 days – after the implementation of the new model.  Locals should request the Schedule A documents of the current routes in preparation for the upcoming restructure, and advise members who will be affected.

Information to Locals, Members

As per the new paragraph 11.04 b), locals should receive a further notice, accompanied by the old and new Schedules A-1 and A-2 for the affected routes when the work has been completed. Locals should then review this information and request local consultation to discuss any issues of concern and how any bidding will be conducted.

Before the restructure, locals should also meet with the members affected in order to identify problem routes as well as other anticipated work floor problems that should be corrected during the upcoming route restructure. After the restructure proposals have been received, it is important to meet with members to identify possible problems with the new routes in preparation for consultation. Members should be kept informed and involved throughout the process.

At this meeting, the employer also said that RSMCs will receive information explaining their route under the new model, including what compensation zone they are in. Members whose salary is red-circled will receive that information. The Union will receive a list of red-circled members and the routes that they hold.

Any differences in pay that result from the new model will appear on the February 14, 2013 pay stub.

National office is working on some material for locals about the RSMC restructure process in the new contract. It will be sent out shortly. Please ensure the results of the restructures and any problems not resolved are brought to the attention of the regional and national levels of the union in writing so we can raise the issues at consultation or file grievances if need be.

If there are any questions or concerns, contact your local office.

 

In Solidarity,

 

Donald Lafleur
4th National Vice-President

2011-2015/Bulletin no. 130

RSMC_2012-01-22 bulletin no 130 - New Compensation Model_inPDF

 

Reminder: Member Survey – Joint Ergonomic Study on the Reaching Device

January 10, 2013

RSMC / Bulletin

2011-2015/128

CUPW and Canada Post have agreed on conducting an independent ergonomic study of the reaching device developed for RSMC rural mail box deliveries.

In offices where Canada Post has already implemented the reaching device, RSMCs received a survey from the Golder Associates consulting firm. We wish to remind the RSMCs involved to please complete the survey and return it as soon as possible to the address indicated. They will receive a payment of $17.00 for filling out the survey. Your opinions on the device and its related products, the work method and other issues regarding its use are critically important. The deadline for returning the form is January 18, 2013. Thank you to those members who have already returned the survey.

The consulting firm will tabulate the results, which will then form part of the preliminary and final report.

In solidarity,

Serge Champoux
National Union Representative - Health and Safety

rsmc reach survey_bul_2011-2015-128_pdf


RSMC Members Ratify Collective Agreement

December 20, 2012

RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No 31


A historic round of negotiations, in difficult times, is complete. RSMC members — the highest authority in the Union have ratified a new Collective Agreement (CA) by 68%.

The new contract includes improvements including better wages, extended health benefits, disability protection, and the creation of permanent relief positions. It represents a significant step down the road toward real equity with the Urban Operations CA, which is still our goal.

Reconciliation payments and back pay will be issued December 20, 2012 and January 19, 2013. The National Executive Board meets in January to make an action plan to ensure we enforce all our rights under the new agreement.

We must thank the RSMC negotiating committee for their hard work in trying times.

The struggle continues!

In Solidarity,

Donald Lafleur

4th National Vice-President and Chief Negotiator

 

Overtime and Hours of Work

in the Tentative Agreement

November 13, 2012

RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No 30


Generally speaking, the RSMC collective agreement is about time structured into routes under the Route Measurement System (RMS), and not about time actually worked.

Normal Workday and Workweek (13.01)

In this round of bargaining, clause 13.01 has been changed slightly so that the “normal work week” includes time worked on other routes under the new clause 13.03.

Excessive Work on Own Route (13.02)

If the RSMC actually works more than 40 hours per week averaged over a 2 week period on his/her own route, the employee must advise the Corporation (CPC) so that the problem can be corrected by an update or restructure under Article 11. Until the route is adjusted, the RSMC is required to use a helper to perform the work exceeding 40 hours per week. The pay for the work performed by the helper (as determined by the Compensation Model) will be deducted from the route holder and paid to the helper by the Corporation. This provision is similar to what exists in the current 2011 contract.

Additional Work on Other Routes (13.03)

The new clause 13.03 allows the employer to offer RSMCs additional work on the sortation and/or delivery portion of another route(s) in order to assist in the coverage of absences. When doing work on another route, the RSMC would get paid for either the sortation or delivery portion (or both) at the compensation model rate for his/her zone and seniority level.

There were local arrangements to this effect in some locations, but there was nothing in the collective agreement about work on other routes. The details of how this work is assigned should be discussed at local consultation.

Overtime (13.04)

Clause 13.04 says that CPC will not pay overtime unless specifically authorized.

However, the Corporation has told CUPW that it interprets the language of Article 13, when read together with the Canada Labour Code, to mean:

  • If a RSMC does work on other routes under the new clause 13.03, and the result is that the total of the evaluated time on his/her own route and the other routes adds up to more than 80 hours in a 2 week period, CPC will pay overtime at time and one half for the time exceeding 80 hours.
  • The “evaluated time” would be determined by the application of the RMS and the Compensation Model.
  • However, the time exceeding 80 hours must be on other routes to be paid overtime.
  • Time worked on your own route will not be paid as overtime.

For example, if the evaluated time of George’s route is 6.4 hours per day, and George is paid for an average 2 hours of evaluated time per day on other routes in a 2 week period, George would be paid for .4 x 10 or 4 hours of overtime at time and one half during that two week period.

If the evaluated time of George’s route is 8.2 hours per day, and he is paid for an average of two hours of evaluated time per day working on other routes in a 2 week period, he will be paid 2 x 10 or 20 hours of overtime at time and one half. He will not be paid overtime for the .2 hours per day on his own route.

Appendix "New 3"

When a route grows to over 60 hours per week of evaluated time, the Corporation must restructure the route.

In Solidarity,

Donald Lafleur

4th National Vice-President and Chief Negotiator

Bulletin no 30 2012-11-13 RSMC OT and hours of work-in PDF

UNION RIGHTS

November 9, 2012

RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No 29

In this round of bargaining, we were successful in obtaining a number of demands that will make it easier for RSMCs to participate in their union, and for stewards and local officers to provide service to members.

Representatives of the Union will be entitled to access non-public areas of RSMC workplaces that are owned or leased directly by the Corporation if they notify the appropriate representative of the Corporation with at least twenty-four hours’ notice and state the time, date and purpose of the visit.

Participation in Union Events

RSMCs selected as delegates to conventions, or to other conferences or seminars of the Union shall be granted an unpaid leave of absence and shall remain on the Corporation’s payroll during the leave. Such leave must be approved by the union and will be reimbursed by the union.

Representation by the Local Union

Stewards and other union representatives who require leave for union business, such as local consultation and grievance hearings will remain on the Corporation’s payroll. The Union will reimburse the Corporation for these leave periods, except for the work of the Joint Health and Safety Committee. The leave must be approved in advance by the union. All other union related duties shall remain unpaid by the Corporation.

Canada Post will notify the local union 30 days before beginning a restructure, will provide information about the restructure to the local union, and will be required to consult with the union about the restructure.

Any signed agreement arising from local consultation shall be precisely recorded in the minutes of the meeting. The local agreement shall require the written approval of the authorized national official of the Union, and will have the same effect as any provision of the contract.

There will be a 60 working day time limit to file a group grievance. The limit for individual grievances shall remain at 25 working days.

Disciplinary Interviews

Several important rights were obtained for members facing disciplinary interviews:

· The Corporation agrees to notify an employee in writing, 24 hours in advance of any interview of a disciplinary nature or related to his or her attendance record and to indicate his or her right to be accompanied by a Union representative.

· The employee has the right to refuse to participate or to continue to participate in such interview unless he or she has received the notice of interview.

 

· A verbal reprimand shall not be considered as a disciplinary measure and shall not be reported in the personal file of the employee.

· In any arbitration relating to disciplinary measure, the burden of proof shall rest with the Corporation and the evidence offered by the Corporation shall be confined to the grounds mentioned in the notice.

More Arbitrators

Arbitrators Serge Brault (Quebec), James Oakley (Atlantic), and Susan Stewart (Ontario) have been added to the regional arbitration lists. Jules Bloch and Serge Brault have been added to the national list.

The relevant grievance number will be on an employee’s pay statement when a portion of the pay is due to the resolution of a grievance.

The addition of these rights is very important in our struggle for justice and equity. The employer strongly resists additional rights for members to participate in their union.

Solidarity,

Donald Lafleur

4th National Vice-President & Chief Negotiator

2012 11 09-Bulletin 29 -RSMC Union Rights-in PDF

 

On-Call and Permanent Relief Employees

November 7, 2012

RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No 28

The tentative agreement provides for an increase in the number of routes covered by on call relief employees (OCREs) as well as the creation of a new type of relief employee who will have permanent status as of January 1, 2014.

The employer will become responsible for covering all types of absences by route holders working in facilities with a minimum of six (6) RSMC routes as of January 1st, 2014.

Facilities that do not get on-call relief employees may still be able to group together to reach the required number of six routes and thus obtain one of one hundred (100) additional positions available.

Permanent Relief Employees – Appendix “New 7”

  • For every 14 RSMC routes in a facility, the employer will hire one (1) permanent relief employee.
  • Approximately seventy (70) installations will have permanent relief employees.
  • Permanent relief employee positions will be offered through the staffing procedure set out in Article 12, that is, internally at first, and then externally if no route holder or OCRE is interested in the position.

· In installations with permanent relief employees, the employer will be responsible for covering all types of absences.

  • Permanent relief employees will have the same entitlements and protection as regular RSMCs
  • Permanent relief employees will be used primarily to cover vacation leave taken by RSMCs. Vacation leave assignments will be offered on the basis of seniority.
  • When there is a known absence of greater than six (6) months, the assignment will be offered to permanent relief employees, on the basis of seniority.
  • These employees will be guaranteed a minimum work schedule of 12 hours per week.
  • When not assigned to a route, a permanent relief employee will be paid sixty (60) dollars per day and will be required to perform other duties assigned by the Corporation for a maximum of three (3) hours per day. When assigned to a route, the permanent relief employee will be paid the values provided for in Appendix “A”, including the vehicle allowance if a corporate vehicle is not provided.
  • Permanent relief employees will be compensated based on their zone and their seniority in the bargaining unit.

On-Call Relief Employees (OCREs) – Appendix “E”

· All postal installations with a minimum of six RSMC routes will have on-call relief employees to cover any absences provided for under the collective agreement.

· There will be on-call relief employees in approximately 269 installations.

· In some installations (with more than 14 RSMC routes), there will be OCREs and permanent relief employees.

· Bidding for annual leave assignments will be based on seniority, and ranking as determined by the last date of hire.

· OCREs will accumulate vacation pay at the rate of four per cent (4%) of their actual wage throughout the calendar year and will be paid no later than March 31st of the following year.

· As payment for designated holidays, OCREs will receive pay equal to 4.4% of their actual wages each month.

· Instead of the current $1,000 payment, all active OCREs will receive a payment of $250 for each quarter in which they have worked fifteen (15) days, provided they are still OCREs at the end of the quarter. The quarters are measured in accordance with relevant calendar year (March 31, June 30, September 30 and December 31).

· OCREs will be paid a $60.00 boot allowance for each quarter, under the same conditions described immediately above.

· OCREs will receive a vest as a uniform.

· The Corporation may authorize an OCRE to use of a type of vehicle other than the one specified for the route being replaced. However, if additional trips are required because the OCRE’s vehicle does not have adequate capacity, he or she will not be entitled to any additional payment.

· OCREs will remain at the minimum wage progress level.

One Hundred (100) Additional OCRE Positions for Installation Groupings – Letter “New 5”

Through consultation, the Union and the Corporation will have the option of creating a maximum of one hundred (100) extra OCRE positions by grouping installations. However, some conditions apply:

· The agreement must be approved by an authorized national representative of the Corporation.

· The grouping can only occur within a radius of fifteen (15) kilometres.

· The grouping can only include offices that report to the same local area supervisor.

· If an OCRE grouping includes a letter carrier depot, the grouping can only include other installations that contain a letter carrier depot.

We recognize that many RSMCs will still have an obligation to provide a replacement to cover an absence, but we firmly believe that these provisions represent a further step in the right direction.

Establishing permanent relief employee positions will increase staffing by 116 employees.

The number of OCREs will also increase through the Corporation becoming responsible for covering all absences in OCRE installations.

The number of OCRE-covered routes would increase from 1,200 to about 4,000 and, through local consultation, it may also be possible to achieve absence coverage on six hundred (600) more routes from the 100 additional OCRE positions available.


In Solidarity,


Donald Lafleur

4th National Vice-President and Chief Negotiator

Bulletin no 28 RSMC relief employees-in PDF

 

 

THE TENTATIVE AGREEMENT PROTECTS AND INCREASES OUR BENEFIT COVERAGE IN A NUMBER OF KEY AREAS

November 5, 2012

RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No 27


Extended Disability Plan (clause 17.04)

· Extends the coverage of the current short term disability plan by an additional 74 weeks. The current short term disability plan provides a maximum of 30 weeks of benefits for workers who are ill or injured. With the addition of the new extended disability plan employees will now have a maximum of two years of coverage (104 weeks).

· The cost of the premiums shall be 100% paid by the employer.

· The payment will be the same as the short term disability plan (STDP) which covers 70% of your base wage. This includes the variable allowance. This is the same rate of payment as the disability insurance plan in the tentative Urban collective agreement.

· The definition of disability will be the same as in the current short term disability plan.

· Employees will not lose their coverage or their benefits when they turn 65 years of age.

Short Term Disability Plan (STDP) (clause 17.03)

If the Urban tentative agreement is ratified, the following changes will be made to the short term disability plan:

  • Employees must authorize the union to represent them in the final level of appeal;
  • “Independent medical physician” will replace “independent occupational health specialist”;
  • No lawyers or witnesses during fact-finding meetings;
  • Employees may choose to have up to twelve (12) personal days paid out at the end of the year.

If the members of the Urban Operations Bargaining Unit do not ratify their tentative collective agreement there will be no changes to the short term disability plan.

Pension (clause 22.01)

The Pension Plan stays the same for current participants. Future participants will be covered by a defined benefit pension plan based on 60/30 or 65/2.

Current Employees

  • A reduction (commonly known as penalty) is imposed if you have not reached 55 years of age and 30 years of pensionable service;
  • There is no reduction if you have reached 60 years of age and 2 years of pensionable service.

Future New Hires

  • A reduction is imposed if an employee has not reached 60 years of age and 30 years of pensionable service;
  • There is no reduction if employee has reached 65 years of age and 2 years of pensionable service.

If the members of the Urban Operations Bargaining Unit do not ratify their tentative collective agreement and their pension plan is subsequently changed, any such changes will also be introduced into the pension plan for future and current RSMCs.

Unpaid Sick Leave (clause 17.01)

As of January 1, 2013, where an employee is unable to perform available work due to illness or injury, the corporation at its discretion may grant leave of absence without pay, provided that the total period of leave does not exceed two (2) years.

In Solidarity,

Donald Lafleur

4th National Vice-President and Chief Negotiator

RSMC Bulletin 27 tentative agreement protects-in PDF

 

 

RED-CIRCLING AS A RESULT

OF THE COMPENSATION MODEL

November 2, 2012

Negotiations RSMC Bulletin No 26

 

When talking about “actual wage,” “red-circling,” and “compensation model,” things can sometimes get a little confusing. There are many questions being raised, and we believe it is important to clearly define what YOUR wage really means.

As you know, RSMCs receive annual compensation based on two components: (1) the actual wage and (2) the vehicle expense set out in clause 33.01(a).

The Actual Wage has two components of its own:

· The variable allowance (personal contacts, householders, and lock changes)

· The pensionable wage (dependent upon total number of Points of Call, Stops, and Kilometers).

Currently, each RSMC is paid a different wage. This is because as contractors negotiations were done individually.

When the first Collective Agreement came into effect, the actual wage was defined in such a way as to distinguish between the work that was performed and the allowance that was paid to compensate employees for providing a vehicle, depending on the number of kilometers travelled to perform work.

Red-Circling In The Tentative Agreement

On December 31, 2012, the Corporation will calculate a red-circle amount for all route holders. This calculation will be based on current actual wage less variable allowance. Any employee whose red-circle amount is greater than his or her activity component on January 1, 2013, shall be maintained at the red-circle amount until the earliest of December 31, 2015, or the time that the employee’s activity component exceeds the red-circle amount based on the Compensation Model.

Conditions For Maintaining Red-Circle Designation

This red-circle amount applies while the employee retains the route that was held on December 31, 2012, or until such time as a restructure has been performed and more than 20% of the total Points of Call have been removed from the route. No RSMC will have their pay reduced unless the above-mentioned conditions are met.

Impact Of Red-Circling

What this means is that if the tentative agreement is ratified and when the Compensation Model is introduced, many RSMCs will have wages that are going to be maintained at a higher rate of pay than the Compensation Model, Zones, and Seniority provide for. Red-circling will offer some wage protection for the RSMCs who are at this higher rate of pay.

It is important to note that the Corporation has indicated in Negotiations, that they have no intention of using the restructuring language in Article 11 to significantly reduce the number of red-circled routes.

Approximate Number of Red-Circled RSMC Routes

2013: 3297

2014: 2443

2015: 1694

These numbers have been provided by CPC and could be subject to change due to restructures/realignments currently underway prior to the possible ratification of the Tentative Agreement.

New Points Of Call Increases

If a red-circled route experiences new growth these new Points of Call will be compensated at the rate of the Compensation Model, Zone, and Seniority. For example: an RSMC in Zone One with 1 year seniority will be compensated at 88% of $18.50 per hour for these points of call. This will equate to $16.28 per hour for these POCs only. All other POCs will be maintained at the red-circled rate. The impact of this will be an increase in wages and a decrease in the hourly rate.

Lump Sum Payments

On January 1, 2013, 2014, and 2015 if an RSMC has maintained the red-circling designation the RSMC will receive a lump sum payment of 1% of their wage component less variable and vehicle allowance. Example: if your wage component is 30,000 dollars this lump sum will be 300 dollars. There will be no increase to annual wages. This methodology will assist in the closing of the gap that currently exists between the minimum and maximum paid routes and, will further assist negotiators in the next round of bargaining to achieve a uniform hourly rate of pay for all RSMCs. Red-circling is in keeping with Demand #3 which was put forward and ratified by the RSMCs in the Program of Demands for this round of Negotiations.

In solidarity,

Donald Lafleur

4th National Vice-President and Chief Negotiator

2012 11 02-Bulletin 26 RSMC red circle-in PDF

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APPENDIX “A”

Variables and Updates

November 1, 2012

RSMC Negotiations

Bulletin No 25


An employee’s annual pay is the difference between the actual wage and vehicle expenses. The actual wage is determined by the activity component, the variable allowance and the knowledge sort and civic addressing allowance. If the tentative agreement is ratified, the values in this bulletin will be in effect.

Variable Allowance

STATUS QUO LANGUAGE:

The variable allowance will continue to be paid separately and calculated in addition to the activity component. An employee’s variable allowance is the annualized total of the following:

Householder Sets (per point of call):

Less than 500 grams: 1.0 cents

Greater than 500 grams and less than 1,000 grams: 10.0 cents

From 1,000 to 2,000 grams: 15.0 cents

Lock Changes:

$1.00 each

Personal Contact Items:

$1.00 each

TENTATIVE AGREEMENT CHANGES:

Beginning January 1, 2014, householder sets (per point of call) less than 500 grams will be increased to one point five (1.5) cents.

Changes to the variable allowance will be made by the Corporation once per calendar year until such time as an employee’s route is automated to capture actual variable allowance data. At such time, the variable allowance will be based on actual data and paid bi-weekly.

Route Updates

Any changes to points of call and kilometers, on an employee’s route will be implemented a minimum of semi-annually. All other route adjustments will be made once per calendar year.

An increase or decrease to total points of call on a route exceeding five percent (5%) shall result in an adjustment in the activity component.

Adjustments resulting in an increase or decrease in the amount payable shall be retroactive to the date the change exceeded five per cent (5%).

Knowledge Sort And Civic Addressing Allowance

Subsequent to January 1, 2013, an employee performing sortation on a route identified as requiring a knowledge sort (a route with no civic addressing at the sortation case) shall be entitled to five (5) cents per day per point of call requiring a knowledge sort. The entitlement under this paragraph exists for a maximum of three (3) months. If civic addressing is implemented on points of call during that period, the entitlement for the affected points of call ends and the following paragraph applies.

Subsequent to January 1, 2013, if an employee is a route holder for which civic addressing changes are implemented to points of call, the route holder shall be entitled to five (5) cents per day per point of call for each point of call on the route receiving a complimentary redirection of mail by the Corporation. The entitlement under this paragraph exists for six (6) months.

The amounts in the preceding two (2) paragraphs shall only be paid to the employee performing the sortation activity on the route.

Solidarity,

Donald Lafleur

4th National Vice-President & Chief Negotiator

Bulletin 25 RSMC APPENDIX A UPDATES-in PDF

********************

 

Appendix “A”

Compensation Model

October 30, 2012

RSMC Negotiations

Bulletin No 24

As indicated in previous bulletins, if the tentative agreement is ratified by members of the RSMC unit, the existing system will change with the implementation of the activity-based compensation model.

Appendix “A”, as it currently exists, is based on monetary values that do not reflect the time values they represent. Currently, when a route changes with the addition or withdrawal of a point of call or new kilometers, an adjustment is made to the time and payment for the route in question. The route holder’s wages increase or decrease, but not in proportion to the time that is allotted. As a result, the hourly rate changes, but rarely in favour of the route holder.

In the proposed compensation model, a proportional monetary value is assigned to the time values found in the existing Route Measurement System (RMS) (some values have been modified – see below). In other words, when there are changes to the points of call or the kilometres on a route, the “hourly” wage will remain proportional to the time allotted, with the exception of the red-circled routes.

Red-circled route holders will see additional points of call and kilometers paid at the compensation model rates, based on their zone and seniority.

Time Values

The Corporation also plans to introduce changes to the RMS. As a result of these changes, routes will have time values that better reflect the current reality, when the compensation model is implemented.

  • The values for sortation and delivery will now be separated to distinguish between inside duties and work performed on the street.

  • The driving time will now be assigned a monetary value and, as a result, a representative time value.

  • Points of call designated as business by the Corporation will finally be recognized as such, in terms of the sortation value, regardless of the receptacle used for delivery. The delivery value for these businesses will be based on the delivery method.

  • The stops will now be calculated based on the number of delivery stops made instead of a percentage based on the type of receptacle, and will have a specific value.

  • An entitlement for knowledge sort (without civic addresses) will be paid for the first three (3) months to each route holder doing the work on a route, as well as to permanent and on-call relief employees.

The following table of monetary values for each zone would replace the values in Appendix “A”. These values represent 100% of the rate for each zone.

Use the information on your Schedule “A” to determine your route’s compensation. Multiply each point of call, kilometre or stop by the figure provided in the above tables. To do this, you will need to know your zone number and seniority date (see bulletin no. 20).

CUPW has developed a calculator to help you do this. You can find it on the CUPW website, at http://www.cupw.ca/RSMCcalc or by scanning the QR code on the left below. The calculator already incorporates the time values, so that you will immediately be able to see the impact the changes will have on your route if the collective agreement is ratified by the membership.

Stay tuned for other bulletins dealing with wages and other Appendix “A” values. I urge you to read them to learn more specifics on the content of the proposed collective agreement.

And make sure you vote.

In solidarity,

Donald Lafleur

4th National Vice-President and Chief Negotiator

Bulletin 24 RSMC appendix A comp model- in PDF

 

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UNIFORMS – ARTICLE 25

October 26, 2012

RSMC Negotiations

Bulletin No 23

If the RSMC Tentative Agreement is ratified, as of May 1, 2013, route holders who are scheduled minimum of twelve

(12) hours per week and all permanent relief employees* will be entitled to a corporate uniform.

An employee required to wear a uniform will be provided credits, in the form of points. These points will be used to obtain the pieces needed to meet the uniform requirements. Allocation of the points will occur in the first full month after an employee becomes eligible and in each subsequent January.

Employees will be permitted to carry over a maximum of 332 each entitlement year. Unused points in excess of the maximum carry over will be forfeited as of December 31th of the entitlement year.

As of May 1, 2013 employees who do not qualify for a uniform will be required to wear a corporate supplied vest. All employees will still be given an annual boot allowance based on their daily scheduled hours.

*New position to be created as of January 1, 2014.

UNIFORM POINTS ENTITLEMENT:

Number of points allocated to employees eligible to a uniform:

 

Solidarity,

Donald Lafleur

4th National Vice-President & Chief Negotiator

Bulletin EN 23 RSMC Uniform-in PDF

 

 

Message from the Negotiating Committee

PERS RUR

October 26, 2012

RSMC Negotiations 2012 / Perspective

 

 

 

The National Executive Board (NEB) has decided to put the tentative collective agreement to a vote of the membership. If the membership supports the NEB recommendation, the changes will be incorporated into the collective agreement, which will remain in force until December 31, 2015 or until the parties obtain the right to lockout or strike. If the membership does not ratify the tentative agreement, the NEB will decide our course of action.

After many frustrating months we have reached the point where we believe it is appropriate to put the decision into the hands of the membership. We are supporting this agreement not only because it contains some significant improvements, but also because we are aware of the level of uncertainty that exists in collective bargaining in the federal sector. Considering the experience of other unions in the rail and airline sectors, and also the experience of the CUPW urban operations unit, we believe there is no guarantee of success if we pursue the conciliation/strike route at this time. The anti-labour bias of the Harper government has only served to reinforce the hardline that has been taken by Canada Post management during the entire length of negotiations.

This tentative agreement represents only the second collective agreement in the history of the Rural and Suburban Mail Carriers, and the first negotiation with the right to strike. We share the disappointment of many members that this agreement does not obtain full equity with members of the urban operations unit. We remain determined to achieve equal wages, equal paid rest periods and meal periods, equal benefits and all other provisions that are necessary to ensure all postal workers are treated with respect and dignity. We also recognize that this agreement contains some positive steps forward. The Extended Health Care Plan, uniforms, extending the disability insurance to two years and the establishment of permanent relief are very important advances achieved in a difficult bargaining climate.

While we recognize that many workers will be red circled and receive only lump sum payments, we also acknowledge that the agreement provides substantial wage increases for the lower paid workers. These increases and the introduction of the activity-based compensation model will bring greater equality amongst RSMCs. These are in addition to many other important changes listed in this tabloid.

We ask that all members to carefully review the tentative agreement. On balance, after considering all of the factors, we believe that accepting the tentative agreement is the best course of action at this time.

Volume 40 • Number 3 • November 2012

PERS RUR

 

 

 

CUPW TABLOID RSMC - PERSPECTIVE - NOVEMBER 2012 - IN PDF FORMAT (CLICK ABOVE IMAGE)

 

***************************


MAJOR IMPROVEMENTS TO THE BENEFIT PLANS

October 24, 2012

RSMC Negotiations

Bulletin No 22


Significant changes to our benefit plans will occur if the tentative agreement is ratified. These changes include modifications to the existing plans and introduction of the Extended Health Care Plan (ECHP) for RSMC route holders and permanent relief. *

Extended Health Care Plan

  • Effective January 1, 2013 all RSMC route holders and permanent relief * are eligible for the EHCP.
  • The cost of the premiums shall be 95% from the employer and 5% from the employee. This new plan is optional.

The Drug Plan

· Prescription Drugs: Reimbursement up to 80% for drugs listed on the Canada Post drug plan.

· The drug plan will now be included in the EHCP. However route holders scheduled for less than 12 hours per week will continue to be excluded from the drug plan.

· If you cancel your coverage, you will no longer have to wait 12 months to reapply.

Paramedical Services

· Covered up to 80% of the annual maximums. Annual maximums per practitioner are as follows:


Acupuncturists: $300;

Chiropractors: $300;

Massage Therapists: $200;

Midwives: $200;

Naturopaths: $300;

Osteopaths: $250;

Physiotherapists: no maximum on covered expenses;

Podiatrists and Chiropodists: $250 combined; Psychologists/social workers: $500 combined;

Speech Therapists and Speech Language Pathologists: $300 combined;

Electrologist: the maximum covered expense for each visit is $10.


Other Services

· Covered up to 80%: Ambulance, home nursing care up to $15,000 in a calendar year, some medical supplies when prescribed by a physician and some oral surgical procedures.

Out-Of-Province Care

· Reimbursement up to a maximum of $25,000 per illness not including hospital daily room charge. (see hospital coverage below).

Emergency Medical Coverage while travelling outside the country

· $100,000 CDN coverage per trip, trip limit of 40 days of departure from home province.

Hospital Coverage

· Reimbursement up to 100% of basic coverage or chosen option for hospital accommodation:

Basic coverage: $60; covered in the plan.

Option A: $130 per day - Employee pays extra premium for this coverage.

Option B: $200 per day - Employee pays extra premium for this coverage.

Vision Care Coverage

· Prescription eye glasses, contact lenses: $400 reimbursable at 80% every 4 calendar years.

This coverage can be combined with the current vision plan for a reimbursement of $620 every 4 calendar years; laser surgery life time maximum can be combined with the current vision plan to increase your maximums in the EHCP. This will give plan members a total reimbursement of $920 for laser surgery (if you are covered under both plans).

Hearing Care Coverage

· $500 reimbursable at 80% every 60 months.

Combined coverage under the extended health care plan and the current vision & hearing care plan: $1,150 every 60 months.

Improvements to the Dental Care Plan

  • Updated Dental Fee Guide: January 1, 2013: the 2012 fee guide will apply; January 1, 2014: the 2013 fee guide will apply; January 1, 2015: the 2014 fee guide will apply.

No other changes to the current plan

  • Employees shall be covered by the plan, effective on the first day of the month following the completion of the six month waiting period.
  • The cost of the premiums shall be 95% from the employer and 5% from the employee.
  • Basic Service: Reimbursement up to 80% to a maximum of $1,000 per calendar year per person.
  • Major Service: Reimbursement up to 70% to a maximum of $1,500 per calendar year per person.
  • Orthodontic: Reimbursement up to 50% to a life time maximum of $2,000 per person (only for children under the age of 22).
  • Annual Deductible: Single coverage: $50; Family coverage: $80.

Current Plan - Vision & Hearing Care Plan

  • No change to the current plan.
  • This plan can be combined with the EHCP to give all route holders and permanent relief* employees increased maximum coverages.
  • Prescription eye glasses, contact lenses, laser eye surgery: $300 reimbursable at 100% every 4 calendar years; $300 additional lifetime maximum for laser surgery.
  • Eye Exams: Eye exams are covered at 100%. Eye exams are not applied to the above maximum amounts.
  • Hearing aids: $750 reimbursed at 100% every 60 months, batteries are covered at the initial time of purchase.

*New positions to be created as of January 1, 2014.

Solidarity,

Donald Lafleur

4th National Vice-President & Chief Negotiator

Bulletin No 22 RSMC MAJOR IMPROVEMENTS-in PDF


Route Restructures

October 19, 2012

RSMC Negotiations

Bulletin No 21


Under the provisions of the Tentative Agreement there will no longer be a Transition Committee and therefore Article 7 (Union Management Meetings) and 11.04 (Information to the Union) of the Tentative Agreement shall apply. The Local shall be responsible for working with the RSMCs when there are restructures, changes, adjustments, audits, or modifications of routes.

A restructure is defined as the reallocation of a minimum of five (5) percent of the points of call from one route to one or more other routes (11.03).

CPC will notify the CUPW Local 30 days prior to a restructure, and provide the Local with the current and proposed Schedule “A”s for the routes in question (11.04). The Local will have 10 days after receiving this documentation to raise any issues and /or request consultation (11.04). Unresolved issues can also be grieved under Article 9.

The Corporation shall not restructure routes for more than forty (40) hours per week (11.03).

PROCESS FOR BIDDING DURING RESTRUCTURES

Offices with less than 6 RSMC ROUTES (11.06)

If an RSMC route retains 60% or more points of call after a restructure, the route holder(s) may elect to retain the route.

If the RSMC does not elect to retain the route, the route is opened for bidding by seniority amongst all RSMCs in the facility who have elected not to retain their routes or who did not retain more than 60% of their route.

Offices with 6 or more RSMC ROUTES (11.06)

MINOR RESTRUCTURE(LESS THAN 50%)

Where a restructure involves less than 50% of the total points of call in an office, the same process as above applies.

MAJOR RESTRUCTURE (MORE THAN 50%)

Where a restructure involves more than 50% of the total points of call in an installation, all route holders and permanent relief shall bid by seniority on all RSMC positions in the postal installation.

REDUCTION OF ROUTES IN A POSTAL INSTALLATION

If the restructure results in a reduction of routes, and a route holder(s) is left without a route he/she may elect to displace the most junior route holder(s) or junior permanent relief employee (in installations with more than 6 routes) if their seniority permits. If displaced, the junior route holder(s) may exercise his/her right to displace the junior permanent relief person if their seniority permits. The route holder(s) or the junior permanent relief person who may be left without a position at the end of this exercise shall be laid off.

The route holder(s) or permanent relief who has been laid off will be placed on a recall list, and will therefore be covered by the provisions of Article 23.

Following the completion of this bidding process any vacant route holder/ or permanent relief positions will be filled in accordance with Article 12.

If the restructure results in surplus employees because CPC has introduced a technological change then the provisions with respect to Technological Change (Article 37) shall apply.

VEHICLE REQUIREMENTS

One of the improvements in this tentative agreement is that an RSMC will be required to provide the specified vehicle on the date of implementation of the restructure (11.05).

In some instances under the current agreement, RSMCs have been unable to bid on routes if they did not have the specified vehicle at the time of bidding.

This new language provides improved protection for RSMCs who are subjected to route restructures.

Solidarity,

Donald Lafleur

4th National Vice-President & Chief Negotiator

2012-10-19 Bulletin no 21_RSMC ROUTE RESTRUCTURES-in PDF

 

 

Compensation Model

RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No 20

October 17, 2012


The activity-based compensation model that will take effect on January 1st, 2013 builds on the current system, but includes a number of changes that address many problems. It is still not an hourly rate system, but brings us very close to it.

The compensation model includes three separate regional rates that will impact an RSMC’s basic wage, based on the location where they work. This model eliminates wage disparities between individuals from the same geographical area.

The regional rates are as follows:

· Zone 1: $18.50

· Zone 2: $20.35

· Zone 3: $21.28

Once the zone is identified (1, 2 or 3), the years of service of each RSMC or permanent relief employee will be used to determine his or her wage rate.

The wage grid has six (6) levels:

· Minimum: 85% of the wage rate for the zone (1, 2 or 3)

· 1 year : 88% of the wage rate for the zone (1, 2 or 3)

· 2 years : 91% of the wage rate for the zone (1, 2 or 3)

· 3 years : 94% of the wage rate for the zone (1, 2 or 3)

· 4 years : 97% of the wage rate for the zone (1, 2 or 3)

· 5 years : 100% of the wage rate for the zone (1, 2 or 3)

It should be noted that on-call relief employees (OCREs) will stay at the minimum wage level for as long as they remain OCREs.

For example, Beatrice has been working as an RSMC for two years in Zone 1; her “hourly” rate will be $16.84 ($18.50 x 91%).

Beatrice has been working as an RSMC for two years in Zone 2; her “hourly” rate will be $18.52 ($20.35 X 91%).

Beatrice has been working as an RSMC for two years in Zone 3; her “hourly” rate will be $19.36 ($21.28 x 91%).

Below is the RSMC wage chart for the duration of the collective agreement.

If your current hourly rate* is higher than the one determined by the compensation model, your wages will be red circled. You will continue to receive these same wages under some conditions, which will be addressed in a later bulletin.

*The hourly rates are only given as a guide. They will not appear in the collective agreement. However, the charts that will be included in the collective agreement were established based on these amounts.

Note: To calculate your current hourly rate, divide your total daily rate (excluding variables and the vehicle allowance) by the number of daily hours indicated in the Schedule “A” for your route.

Solidarity,


Donald Lafleur

4th National Vice-President & Chief Negotiator

2012-10-17 RSMC Bulletin no 20 Compensation Model-PDF

 

Reconciliation Fund Distribution and Payment

October 15, 2012

RSMC Negotiations 2012 / Bulletin

2012 RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No. 19

Brian Keller, the arbitrator in the last reopener, ruled that any money remaining – out of the $652 million the Corporation was under contractual obligation to allocate to the RSMCs during the life of the collective agreement – was to be placed in a reconciliation fund, once the final accounting was completed.

After much deliberation between the parties with respect to outstanding grievances, workers’ compensation and pension costs, it was decided that the amount of money allocated to the Reconciliation Fund is twenty four million ($24,000,000.00).

March 1, 2011 is the agreed upon date for the retroactive wage increase.

The reconciliation fund will be paid out in the following manner:

Lump sum ($12 million)

Fifty percent (50%) of the reconciliation fund will be paid out as a lump sum payment as follows:

  1. A lump sum in the amount of sixteen hundred and sixty dollars ($1,660.00) will be paid to each employee who held a route on March 1, 2011.

  2. Seven hundred and forty thousand dollars ($740,000.00) will be divided between on call relief employees who were employed as an on call relief employee on March 1, 2011. The payment will be pro-rated based on the on call relief employee’s actual wages earned between March 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012. The maximum amount payable to an on call relief employee is sixteen hundred and sixty dollars ($1,660.00).

CPC is committed to paying the lump sum on December 20, 2012.

Wage increase ($12 million)

The remaining fifty percent (50%) of the reconciliation fund will be paid out to route holders as follows:

  1. Fifty percent (50%) of the $12 million will be paid as a general annual pay increase to all route holders retroactive to March 1, 2011. This represents a wage increase of fifty-three cents ($0.53) per hour.

  2. Fifty percent (50%) of the $12 million will be paid out as an annual pay increase to the lowest paid route holders retroactive to March 1, 2011. The amount allocated to each route holder will depend on his or her current salary. This will bring the minimum wage rate to $17.20 per hour.

CPC is committed to paying the retroactive wage increase for 2011 on December 20, 2012.

CPC is committed to paying the retroactive wage increase for 2012 on January 19, 2013.

In solidarity,

Donald Lafleur
4th National Vice-President and Chief Negotiator

rsmcfrs_neg2012_bul_19_Recon fund in PDF


 

RSMC MEMBERSHIP TO VOTE

ON COLLECTIVE AGREEMENT

 

October 9, 2012

 

 

Negotiations Bulletin #18 (RSMC)

The National Executive Board (NEB) has endorsed a tentative agreement with CPC for a new collective agreement to cover 7,200 members of the Rural and Suburban Mail Carriers unit at Canada Post. The NEB’s recommendation will be put to a vote by secret ballot between November 13, 2012 and December 19, 2012.

Important Improvements

While the proposed collective agreement includes many important improvements, it does not provide for equality with members of the urban operations group. However it does bring us closer to that goal, which we will continue to pursue.

The NEB is recommending the tentative agreement because of the improvements it contains and because we believe that, with the current anti-worker actions of the Harper government, it is the best agreement possible at this time.

Membership to Decide

The NEB has decided to put the tentative agreement to a vote of the membership because we believe that it is your right to decide on the course of action that we shall follow. If the membership votes yes we will have a collective agreement that we will live under until December 31, 2015. If the agreement is turned down the National Executive Board will decide the next step.

The highlights of the tentative agreement are as follows:

Duration of the Collective Agreement

· 4-year collective agreement ending December 31, 2015.

Compensation: Pay

· January 1, 2012, all employees receive 2.5% raise, following the reconciliation wage increase as per the Keller award.

· On January 1, 2013 a new activity-based compensation model to be introduced with three pay zones based on the following base wage levels:

Zone 1: $18.50

Zone 2: $20.35

Zone 3: $21.28

· The zones are as follows:

Zone 1: Atlantic, Quebec, Thunder Bay and other Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan

Zone 2: Southwestern Ontario, GTA, British Columbia, other Alberta, and shared depots surrounding mechanized plants

Zone 3: Calgary, Edmonton, Fort McMurray, Nunavut, NWT and Yukon.

· The starting rate for new employees will be the following percentage of the base rate in each zone:

0-1 years of service: 85%

1-2 years of service: 88%

2-3 years of service: 91%

3-4 years of service: 94%

4-5 years of service: 97%

5 years or more: 100%

· On January 1, 2014 and January 1, 2015, all wage levels will increase as follows:

Zone 1: 2.5%

Zone 2: 2.0%

Zone 3: 2.0%

· On January 1, 2013 all employees with less than five years of service will receive the wages based on their respective place on the wage grid. For example, an employee with 4 years of service shall receive 97% of the basic pay rate for her or his zone.

· Effective January 1, 2013 all employees earning more than the above wage levels will be red-circled until the wage increases provided for in the collective agreement produce a wage level which is greater than the employee is already receiving.

· When an employee is red circled and changes routes or when a route experiences a reduction of 20% or more points of call the employee loses their status of being red circled.

Compensation: Other

· Effective January 1, 2014 there will be a ½ cent increase for householders.

· Recovery of overpayments over $50.00 to be made at 10% per pay.

· Vehicle expenses to be increased to CRA rate as of January 1, 2013 or 60 days following any future change in the CRA rate.

· Points of call to be adjusted twice per year.

· CPC will move to an automated system that will permit more frequent updating of variable allowances.

· Employees may be permitted to sort or deliver portions of other routes, and will be compensated as an employee based on the Compensation Model in their zone and years of service.

Activity Model

· The activity model includes the work in the current RSMC Route Management System (RMS) with some changes. The time required to perform this work is determined by the RMS values. The total amount of time allocated is then converted to money value and is used to calculate the salary of an employee. The wage rate for the respective zone and years of service is then applied.

Benefits

· Effective January 1, 2013, an Extended Disability program to cover 74 weeks of benefits paid at 70% of basic pay. Contributions to be paid 100% by CPC.

· No change to any aspect of the pension of current employees. Future employees will be entitled to a defined benefit pension plan with full indexing with early retirement at 60 years of age and 30 years of service.

· Effective January 1, 2013 route holders and permanent relief employees shall be entitled to the provisions of CPC’s Extended Health Care Plan (EHCP). There are lower maximums on some paramedical services.

· Effective January 1, 2013 the 2012 Dental Fee Schedule will apply. On January 1, 2014 the 2013 schedule will apply and the 2014 Schedule will apply effective January 1, 2015.

· There are some improvements in the short term disability plan but it is largely the same with respect to levels of pay (70%), number of personal days and the waiting period.

Uniforms

· Effective May 1, 2013 route holders scheduled for 12 hours per week or more and permanent relief employees shall be entitled to a uniform.

Relief

· Creation of permanent relief positions in offices with 14 or more RSMC routes.

· Approximately 116 permanent relief positions will be created in 70 installations.

· On Call Relief Employees (OCRES) will be used in all installations with six or more routes. There is the possibility to add up to 100 OCRE positions by groupings in small installations. In many smaller locations employees will still be required to train and provide their own replacements to cover all absences.

· Vacation bidding to be implemented in all offices with permanent or on call relief.

OCRES

· On call relief employees (OCREs) will be paid the minimum rate of pay for the route that they are covering.

· OCREs shall receive a retention allowance of $250.00 as well as a boot allowance of $60.00 to be paid quarterly provided the employee is employed as an OCRE for the entire quarter and works at least 15 occasions.

· OCREs shall be provided a uniform vest commencing May 1, 2013.

Training

· Elimination of training for RSMCs when they obtain a new route.

· Beginning in 2014 five days of training for all new employees including three days on route. This three day on route training to be will be conducted by peers beginning in 2014 and paid at route value.

· For in-office or self-study training employees will be paid $135.00 per day.

· Human rights training to be provided for all new employees.

· Employees who receive a right hand drive vehicle are required to obtain a Vehicle Operators Permit (VOP). Training will be provided by CPC.

Restructures

· Bidding by seniority in some circumstances during restructures.

· There will be local consultation during route restructure process. CPC will provide union local 30 days’ notice of planned restructures. The Corporation will provide documentation and the Union will have 10 days to reply to the employer after it receives the documentation.

· CPC to restructure routes that are assessed at more than 60 hours evaluated time.

Right Hand Drive Vehicles

· Concerning the introduction of 522 right hand drive corporate vehicles, the Memorandum of Agreement negotiated under the technological change provisions of Article 37 will be included in the collective agreement. This includes payment for training, some financial reimbursement for vehicles that have been bought or leased within two (2) years prior to receiving offer of right hand drive vehicle, and additional vehicle expense payments for employees who purchase their own right hand drive vehicle.

Union Rights

· The burden of proof rests on the Employer in arbitrations for disciplinary-related measures.

· Verbal reprimand not to be considered disciplinary measure.

· Time limits for group grievances to be extended to 60 days.

· New arbitrators added to the lists.

· Grievance number to be placed on pay stubs when they receive a payment resulting from a grievance.

· Local memorandum of agreements to be approved by National Union and to be recorded in minutes.

· Local agreements subject to the grievance procedure.

· Local union representatives to remain on the payroll when executing duties.

· The union will reimburse the employer for all union leave with the exception of joint health and safety duties.

· Union representatives to be granted access to non-public areas of all corporate owned and leased post offices provided 24 hour notice is provided.

Pregnant Employees

· Protections for the precautionary cessation of work for pregnant employees to be included in the collective agreement.

Transition Committee

· Elimination of the Transition Committee.

Financial Cap

· Elimination of all references to the financial cap.

These are the main points of the tentative agreement that was reached with Canada Post. The Union is now preparing all the necessary documents, including a complete draft of all the changes to the current agreement, to help you make an informed decision.

This decision will be yours to make. Please participate in this decision by voting at your local ratification meetings.

Solidarity,

Donald Lafleur

4th National Vice-President & Chief Negotiator

2011-2015/Bulletin #18 - 92

2012 10 09-RSMC members to vote on CA - in PDF

 

 

Tentative Agreement

(RSMC Unit)

October 5, 2012

RSMC Negotiations 2012 / Bulletin

2012 RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No. 17

This afternoon after many weeks of discussion and some very tough decisions, the Union and Canada Post have reached a tentative agreement for the Rural and Suburban Mail Carriers (RSMC) Collective Agreement.

To ensure that the members receive accurate information, details will be forthcoming early next week.

Watch for bulletins and check with your Local as to when your ratification vote will be held.

In solidarity,

Donald Lafleur
4th National Vice-President and Chief Negotiator

rsmcfrs_neg2012_bul_17_Tentative agreement-PDF

 

 

RSMC Right Hand Drive Vehicle Update

September 26, 2012

RSMC / Bulletin

2011-2015/088

On August 31, 2012, we reported on the Union’s intention to apply for a cease and desist order under the Canada Labour Code. Our application included asking the Arbitrator to cease the introduction of Right Hand Drive Vehicles (RHD), without first negotiating the new working conditions with the Union. The hearing before Arbitrator Stewart was scheduled for September 21, 2012. In what the Union believes was a delay tactic, Canada Post changed their legal counsel on the file, who was not available to attend the hearing on September 21. The Union disagreed with the corporation’s request for a postponement. Following a conference call with the Arbitrator, the Union and Canada Post, Arbitrator Stewart granted the postponement to Canada Post and decided that she would not hear the cease and desist and would proceed directly to hear the case on its merits. Arbitrator Stewart indicated that she wanted definitive dates from the parties and provided several dates, including a weekend. As a result, we have found dates in January 2013.

We believe that a negotiated settlement is preferable to unilateral actions by Canada Post. The Union continues to meet on a regular basis with Canada Post representatives in order to negotiate resolutions to the adverse effects that may surface.

We will keep you informed as developments occur.

In solidarity,

Gayle Bossenberry
1st National Vice-President

bul_2011-2015-088_RSMC_RHDV update-in PDF

 

 

“NO MANDATE TO NEGOTIATE EQUITY”, SAYS CPC

September 6, 2012 RSMC

Negotiations Bulletin No 16

We started this round of RSMC negotiations by tabling more than 70 demands from RSMCs from coast to coast. We were given the mandate to present these demands at the bargaining table. The Negotiating Committee began its work on November 8, 2011, preparing supporting material for each demand. Equity was the main goal of this round of bargaining.

Global Offers Exchanged

The Negotiating Committee met with the employer on numerous occasions to explain why the demands were submitted by RSMC members. The employer tabled a global offer on March 7, 2012.

The employer’s offer dealt with only about 20 of the demands submitted by members of the rural bargaining unit. Some of the proposals made in the employer’s offer need to be improved, some need a major overhaul and others are totally unacceptable.

In response, CUPW submitted its own global offer on May 7, 2012. We believe this offer meets most of the needs of rural and suburban mail carriers in terms of equality, respect and progress.

CPC: No Mandate to Negotiate Equity

The employer called our offer unreasonable and stated that it was financially non-viable for the Corporation. They said that they wanted a proposal from us that was close to their global offer.

Since then, CUPW has attempted to start discussions on some of the smaller issues where we are near agreement.

At meetings, which took place on August 9, and 21, 2012, employer representatives said clearly that they did not have a mandate to negotiate wage equity.

Many other issues important to RSMCs also remain unresolved

The employer:

  • Is insisting on unequal regional rates of pay.
  • Still refuses to pay RSMCs an hourly wage for all scheduled hours, to pay for overtime and to pay for all hours worked.
  • Has not agreed to provide relief employees for and to assume responsibility to cover all absences. In most offices, RSMCs would still be responsible for finding and training replacements.
  • Refuses the use of seniority in route restructures and realignments in offices of fewer than 10 RSMCs. Selection of relief assignments is not required to be done by seniority.
  • Refuses to agree to a Route Measurement System as part of the collective agreement and to credit time for all work activities.
  • Refuses paid union leave to participate as union officers and stewards.
  • Has not agreed to a national transfer process.

Many of these issues are of particular importance to members in offices with a smaller number of RSMCs.

No meetings are scheduled at this time, but we remain available to negotiate. It is unclear what the next step is.

Time to Get Ready

It does not appear as though the employer understands that RSMCs are serious about their demands. Before long, CUPW may need to schedule strike votes in order to encourage the employer to negotiate more seriously.

Solidarity,

 


Donald Lafleur

4th National Vice-President & Chief Negotiator

2012-09-06 Bulletin no 16 No mandate to Negotiate Equity-PDF

 

 

Canada Post Provides Vehicles for RSMCs

August 31, 2012

RSMC / Bulletin 2011-2015/078

Canada Post has notified the Union of its intention to introduce 520 right-hand drive (RHD) corporate vehicles. These new or refurbished vehicles will replace RSMC personal vehicles. Canada Post has set the route criteria for obtaining these vehicles at 330 rural mail boxes (RMBs) with a delivery rate of at least 50 RMBs per hour.

CUPW Demand on the Bargaining Table

The allocation of corporate vehicles to RSMC members is a demand on the bargaining table and an important step forward in achieving a fair and equitable collective agreement. Under the technological change language of the RSMC collective agreement (Article 37), Canada Post must present all the information related to this initiative and negotiate a resolution to adverse effects that may surface now or in the future. The Union has been meeting with management to deal with the changes to working conditions and procedures for members affected.

Unfortunately, despite many meetings and discussions over several weeks, management refuses to acknowledge some of the problems, let alone agree on solutions. The Union has now applied for a cease and desist order under the Canada Labour Code. If successful, this application would prevent Canada Post from making changes to working conditions. The Union is asking the national arbitrator to order the Corporation to cease any action related to the introduction of RHD vehicles, without first negotiating the new working conditions. A hearing has been scheduled for September 21, 2012.

The Union believes that a negotiated settlement is preferable to unilateral actions by the Corporation. Further information related to the RHD vehicles, the cease and desist application and the outcome of the negotiations will be made available as soon as possible.

Delivery to rural mail boxes is an important service to the public. We must ensure that this service can continue in a safe and proper manner with acceptable working conditions for those providing the service.

In solidarity,

Gayle Bossenberry
1st National Vice-President

bul_2011-2015-078_RSMC Vehicles-PDF

 


Out of Town Shouldn’t Mean Out of Luck for Rural Mail Carriers

RSMC Negotiations 2012

Opinion-Editorial

August 27, 2012

By Denis Lemelin

Many might believe that Canada is an essentially urban country, with its population concentrated in the big cities. But at least one-fifth of Canadians live and work in rural and small town communities, and many more of us reside in suburbs and satellite towns. Where we live is part of who we are, but it also affects how we are treated and the services we can access. Those of us who live and work in rural areas do not always get the same respect as urban residents or workers, especially from Canada Post.

On an average day everywhere in this country, more than 7000 rural and suburban mail carriers (RSMCs) are driving the equivalent of ten trips around the globe. 68% of them are women. They’re delivering mail to more than 4 million addresses across Canada, including 750,000 rural mailboxes. And they’re maintaining and fuelling their own vehicles to do it. They’re part of a vast network bringing goods and services to rural and suburban areas. And they’re doing it all for less than their urban counterparts.

For many years, rural mail carriers were classified as independent contractors. In the past, people had to bid against their neighbors for rural routes — ending up with often less than minimum wage and no benefits. In 2003, following decades of organizing by the rural mail carriers, the Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) made an agreement with Canada Post to contract them in. The RSMCs became employees with rights and benefits and protections. Getting unionized has helped rural mail carriers, which, in turn, has contributed to the prosperity of their local communities. They have seen some decent wage increases and better job security as well as getting vehicle compensation and holidays.

But in many ways, rural mail carriers still find themselves on the wrong side of the rural-urban divide. Their work is not recognized equally at Canada Post and they have a long way to go to achieve parity with urban mail carriers, even though they do the same work. That is why the CUPW is currently negotiating a new contract for rural mail carriers on the principles of equality, respect and progress. Rural mail carriers shouldn’t have to settle for less just because of where they live and work. Basic issues such as a fair hourly wage, company uniforms, an adequate route measurement system, and health and safety protections, among others, are on the negotiations table now.

All workers should be able to expect fair and equal treatment. All workers deserve safe and healthy workplaces. Rural residents and businesses also deserve more from their public postal service. So, the next time you meet or speak with your rural mail carrier, let them know you support them. They are the heart of your community – take their issues to heart.

-Denis Lemelin
CUPW National President

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Reaching Device For Rural And Suburban Mail Carriers

 

July 24, 2012

Health and Safety / Bulletin

2011-2015/068

Dear Sisters and Brothers:

On April 4, 2012, Canada Post advised the Union, under article 37 of the RSMC collective agreement, that it would be implementing a series of new working tools for RSMCs, including a reaching device (pole), a holder and a support hook to hold the pole in the passenger window. This reaching device is intended for RSMCs who have less than 330 rural mail boxes on their route and who do not have a right-hand drive vehicle.

In further correspondence with the Corporation, the Union took the position that the employer did not comply with its obligations under article 37, particularly by failing to identify all adverse effects which might result from the implementation of this new equipment.

An ad hoc committee was established to negotiate with CPC the introduction of this technological change in accordance with article 37 of the RSMC collective agreement. This committee is under the responsibility of Sister Gayle Bossenberry, 1st National Vice-President.

Parties met on July 20, 2012 to start negotiations. The Union restated its position that the tests conducted by the Corporation were not statistically significant and did not properly represent all workers.

From the outset, the Union told the Corporation that RSMCs were not guinea-pigs and that it was absolutely necessary to conduct a joint ergonomic study before introducing this tool into the workplace. In its correspondence, the Corporation agreed to carry out the study but onlyafter the implementation of the reaching device. The Union explained its position on the issue and the employer said it would get back to us at the next meeting scheduled for July 26, 2012.

If the parties fail to reach an agreement, they will refer the issue to an interest arbitrator, appointed by mutual agreement of the parties or by the Labour Minister.

In solidarity,

Serge Champoux
National Union Representative - Health and Safety

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CPC Rejects CUPW Global Offer

July 19, 2012

RSMC Negotiations 2012 / Bulletin

2012 RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No. 15

CUPW met with Canada Post (CPC) on June 26, 2012 to hear the Corporation’s response to the Union’s May 7, 2012 global offer (see RSMC Negotiation Bulletin #10).

CUPW Global Offer Rejected

In general, CPC said that CUPW’s offer was a long way from the Corporation’s March 7, 2012 global offer (see bulletin # 9). Canada Post said that their March 7 offer should be seen as something that they would offer “at the doorstep of conciliation” rather than as an opening offer. They said that it could be “tweaked” a bit, but it was near their final position.

A Few Small Steps

However, the Corporation did respond with four (4) adjustments to their previous position:

  • They were withdrawing their proposal for “final offer selection” arbitration for the subsequent round of bargaining.
  • They would agree to deal with Canada Post pensions in the same way as is decided for the Urban Operations contract in arbitration.
  • They would move from a 4 year contract to a 3 year contract. A 3 year contract would put the end date very near to the end of the Urban Operations contract, as determined by the “back to work”legislation.
  • They proposed to change their regional pay rate structure from 9 “zones” to 4 “zones”, and to structure the system so that no one would receive a decrease in pay. The base rate would be $18.50 per hour, and the weighted national average would be $19.95 per hour. However, CPC refused to move to the Union’s standard hourly rate proposal. (Details of the employer’s regional pay proposal will be provided in an upcoming bulletin.)

Adjustments to RMS

In regard to the Route Management System (RMS), CPC rejected the Union’s proposal to put the RMS in the contract. However, they did say that the Corporation was planning to make some adjustments to the way in which the RMS is applied:

  • All business points of call (POCs) identified in CPC’s Address Management System will now be credited with a sortation time as a business point of call, whether or not they receive counter service. They said that these corrections would affect about 100,000 POCs and increase time credits on RSMC routes.
  • Routes would be credited for actual stops as opposed to an average number of stops. CPC said that this would make the system more accurate and fair, but would decrease the overall time credits on RSMC routes.
  • A 40 km. per hour driving speed would be applied where there is an average of more than 2 stops per hour, increasing the amount of driving time credited. The current 50 km. per hour would continue to apply where there are two or fewer stops per hour.
  • Knowledge sort credits will be removed, resulting in a loss of time credits. However, for the first 3 months on a route, RSMCs would get a “knowledge sort premium”. CPC said that overall, this premium would be the equivalent of 30,000 minutes.

The Corporation said that the net impact of these changes (knowledge sort premium excepted) would be an addition of 55,000 minutes to RSMC routes.

CPC also said that some of the RMS changes proposed by the Union in its global offer included time credits for work already accounted for in the current RMS.

CUPW asked for a more detailed explanation of the proposed CPC RMS adjustments as well as the time credits that CPC is asserting are already part of the existing RMS.

No Response on Equity

Canada Post said that it did not plan to make another global offer until the Union presented proposals that were closer to its March 7 global offer.

CUPW asked how CPC planned to deal with the Pay Equity issues, and its obligations under Canadian law.

The Corporation did not respond in regard to equity.

The Union reiterated that the Corporation’s proposal did not address a significant number of important concerns of the RSMC membership, such as an hourly rate of pay, pay for all hours worked, the employer taking responsibility for finding replacements, adequate relief staffing, seniority and rights for relief employees, and allotment of right hand drive vehicles.

CUPW also said that the employer needs to accept proposed Union language on proposals in the CPC March 7 global offer put forward in response to CUPW demands.

It is important to continue to show your support for your Negotiating Committee on the work floor and to participate in activities organized by your local.

In solidarity,

Donald Lafleur
4th National Vice-President and Chief Negotiator

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RSMC Are you a Member In Good Standing?

July 12, 2012

Membership / Bulletin

2011-2015/63

In the past weeks, the Negotiators have had the opportunity to speak to the many RSMCs who left messages at the end of the Virtual Town Hall meeting (conference call) held on June 10, 2012. Some of the questions, while all very important, did not pertain to the current round of Negotiations. These questions were forwarded to the appropriate departments in CUPW’s National or Regional offices for a response. In some cases, members may not have received a call yet.

One of the polling questions that we asked during the virtual meeting was “How many of you are members in good standing -- meaning have you signed your membership card?” 86% of the RSMCs on the call responded“yes”, while 14% responded with “no” or “not sure”.

Each and every member should make sure that they have signed a membership card and follow up with their Local to ensure that the card has been received by the National Office. There are a number of reasons that CUPW membership is very important:

  • Membership allows full participation in union activities such as taking part in monthly membership meetings and in education seminars, holding union representative positions and participating in meetings to set demands for negotiations.
  • Only members in good standing are eligible to receive strike pay in the event of a strike or lockout.
  • All CUPW members are entitled to a life insurance benefit. This benefit is available to the members, their spouses, and dependent children, as well as to retirees (up to age 70).

You can obtain more information from your local CUPW office.

We were happy to have had the opportunity to speak with the members who took part in the Virtual Town Hall meeting held on June 10, 2012.

In solidarity,

Denis Lemelin
National President

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RSMC Town Hall a Success

June 14, 2012

RSMC Negotiations 2012 / Bulletin

2012 RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No. 14

On Sunday, June 10, 2012, the Union tried a new way of communicating with RSMC members across the country via a phone forum that called every RSMC we have contact information for. Members were invited to ask questions of RSMC negotiators Brother Donald Lafleur, and Sisters Shelley Sillers and Nancy Beauchamp. Our National President Denis Lemelin moderated the forum.

Both English and French town halls were well attended. Many RSMCs asked questions during the one-hour period, covering pay equity, the new reaching device, the reconciliation fund, Right Hand Drive vehicles and the timeline for negotiations, among others.

Although we managed to get to quite a number of questions, not everybody had their chance to speak live during the forum. While a temporary setback occurred due to a technical glitch that made it seem as though some questions and comments left at the end of the forum had been misplaced, I am now happy to inform you that all these messages have successfully been retrieved and now can be addressed by Union representatives. Over the next weeks, we will be listening to your feedback and responding to all the questions that were recorded by members following the town hall meeting.

Keep Up to Date

Some members may not have been contacted because the Union did not have their current information.

Please make sure you send us your current contact information including a phone number by using the feedback form on the CUPW website.

cupw.ca/feedback

This Town Hall brought us together and allowed us to have good conversations about our issues. As a Union, we must continue these conversations to remain strong and united in achieving our goal of fairness, respect and a better contract for all RSMCs.

The struggle continues.

In solidarity,

Gayle Bossenberry
1st National Vice-President

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URGENT MESSAGE for English-Language Participants in the RSMC Town Hall Meeting Sunday, June 10

June 12, 2012 - 16:00

RSMC Negotiations 2012 / Bulletin

2012 RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No. 13

If you participated in the English-language telephone town hall meeting on Sunday and left a comment or question after the live discussion was finished, we thank you. The purpose of the call was to open the door to greater transparency and dialogue within CUPW.

Unfortunately, an error at the phone company has made it impossible for us to retrieve those messages. We want to hear from you!

Today at 6 p.m. local time, you will get a phone call -- on the same phone you used to participate in the town hall -- with recorded instructions on how to call in and leave your question or comment again. The line will be open until the end of day Friday.

We are looking forward to hearing and addressing all your questions and concerns. Thank you for entering this dialogue with CUPW.

In solidarity,

Gayle Bossenberry
1st National Vice-President

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May 31, 2012

RSMC Negotiations 2012 / Bulletin

2012 RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No. 11

National RSMC Virtual Town Hall June 10th – Mark Your Calendars – We’ll Call You.

Sisters/Brothers:

While RSMC negotiations are underway, your union representatives are well aware of what a challenge it will be to bring all of us together when negotiations come down to the crunch. We know that many RSMCs live and work in small and rural communities, while others work alongside urban members.

That’s why we are going to try something new and unprecedented for our Union – an open phone forum for all RSMCs across the country. Such forums have been tried with great success in other unions. It gives us a chance to come together, to talk about our issues, to ask questions and to connect with other RSMCs and union representatives.

Two forums – one French, one English - are scheduled for Sunday June 10th.

French from 2 - 3 pm (EDT).

English from 4 - 5 pm (EDT).

This time was arranged to ensure the greatest possible participation. Making time for this call would be greatly appreciated.

All RSMCs are invited to participate. Here’s how it works: you will receive a telephone reminder prior to the call. On June 10th, your phone will ring at 2 pm EDT if you participate in the French forum, or at 4 pm EDT if you participate in the English forum. When you pick up the phone, you’ll automatically be placed in the call.

Please note that all questions will be screened to ensure we can answer as many as possible and to avoid duplication. All RSMCs will have the opportunity to pose questions and comments following the call. Union representatives will follow up on each and every one of these if we didn’t have time to address them during the call.

The call will be moderated by Brother Denis Lemelin, National President, with Brother Donald Lafleur, RSMC chief negotiator and RSMC’s negotiators participating. Elected officers and union representatives will be listening on the line as well as many Local Presidents. But as RSMCS, you are the ones who will have the floor. Your elected officers are there to listen to your voices.

We look forward to hearing from you on June 10th. You are the Union.

In solidarity,

Gayle Bossenberry
1st National Vice-President


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RSMC Negotiations: CUPW Presents Global Offer

May 8, 2012

RSMC Negotiations 2012 / Bulletin

2012 RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No. 10

 

Yesterday the CUPW RSMC National Negotiating Committee presented Canada Post with a Global Offer for Settlement. The Union’s offer is a comprehensive proposal which includes collective agreement language on all of the issues in dispute.

Central to our proposal is the Union’s demand for full equality with the terms and conditions that exist in the collective agreement which covers Urban Operations employees including wages, benefits, rights and working conditions.

Key Provisions in the Union’s Global Offer include:

Wages: The wage proposal provides for a national wage scale identical to that for letter carriers as determined by the back to work legislation. The maximum wage rates are as follows:

January 1, 2012: $24.57 per hour

February 1, 2012: $24.94 per hour

February 1, 2013: $25.44 per hour

February 1, 2014: $25.95 per hour

The Union rejects CPC’s proposal for regional rates. Employees whose hourly rate exceeds those in the Urban agreement shall continue to receive their hourly rate until such a time as the negotiated national pay exceeds their rate of pay or until their route is restructured under the time values with the inclusion of the meal and rest periods. Red circled employees shall receive a lump sum payment of 1% of their current salaries on January 1st of each year.

Cost of Living Allowance (COLA): The COLA will be effective on February 1, 2012 and trigger after the Consumer Price Index increases 5.5% more than its level as of January 2012.

Hours of Work: Employees shall be paid for all hours of work with overtime rates paid at either time and a half (1½ ) or double (2) time as appropriate. The entitlement to paid meal periods and 15 minute paid rest periods shall be the same as those included in the Urban Operations collective agreement. The half-hour paid meal period and rest periods will be applied immediately to all routes for the purposes of pay and shall be included in the calculation of work time.

Time Values and Restructures: All routes will be restructured based on new time values which have been proposed by the Union and which cover all aspects of RSMC work based on an eight-hour (8) day. There shall be an agreed upon schedule for the restructures, with a minimum of 20% of routes to be restructured by January 31, 2013, another 40% by January 31, 2014, and the rest prior to the expiry of the collective agreement. The rules for restructures, including the Union’s rights to participate and observe will be the same as under the Urban Operations agreement. Routes shall be selected by seniority.

Benefits: The following benefits shall apply:

  • The long term disability plan (LTD) which is available to other employees at Canada Post.

  • Yearly updates to the dental fee guide.

  • All permanent employees shall be entitled to the drug plan and the rest of the extended health care plan (EHCP).

The Union rejects the Employer’s proposal for a defined contribution pension plan for new hires.

Vacation Leave: Effective January 1, 2012 all employees shall be entitled to four weeks of paid vacation upon completion of seven (7) years of service.

Paid Sick Leave: Include a program of paid of sick leave. Employees shall accumulate sick leave credits at the rate of one and one quarter (1¼) days per month.

Injury on Duty Leave: Employees on injury on duty leave to receive pay equal to 100% of the regular wages under rules identical to the Urban Operations collective agreement.

Uniforms: The uniform entitlement shall be the same as that of the letter carriers as provided for in the Urban Operations agreement.

Technological Change and Job Security: No lay off of any employee who was employed as of January 1, 2012 or employees hired after January 1, 2012 who have five years of service. These employees may be required to be relocated up to 40 kilometres. Other employees shall not be laid off provided they are prepared to relocate to an available vacancy. Provisions of guaranteed employment, pay, and classification and provisions for retraining and a displacement allowance shall apply in cases of technological change.

Corporate Provided Vehicles: CPC to provide corporate-owned right hand drive vehicles to all routes that provide service to more than 50 rural mailboxes per hour or a total of 185 or more rural mailboxes per day. There shall be a process to require CPC to provide vehicles to other RSMCs in addition to those servicing rural mail boxes. CPC shall be responsible for all costs associated with Corporate vehicles. Employees who have recently entered into a lease or loan agreement for their vehicle shall be given the option of delaying the implementation until their lease or loan arrangement has expired. All special allowances shall continue.

Vehicle Allowance: Employees shall receive the maximum CRA rate for their vehicle allowance.

Rights to Union Representation: Union representatives shall have access to the workplace in the same manner that applies to other bargaining units. Union stewards shall have the right to communicate with employees and prepare and present grievances during their hours of work without loss of pay.

Relief Employees: RSMCs shall no longer have the obligation to provide their own replacements. CPC shall be responsible for hiring relief employees and for covering all absences. There shall be a minimum of 1 permanent relief employee per installation or group of installations with 12 routes. If additional relief employees would have been required more than sixty-five per cent of the preceding 12 months an additional position will be established. On-Call Relief Employees (OCREs) will be available to cover other absences. One On-Call Relief Employee (OCREs) will be hired in offices of 1-6 routes and 2 OCREs will be hired for offices of 7-11 routes. Permanent relief employees shall have the same rights as RSMC route holders.

Rights of On-Call Relief Employees (OCREs): The rights of OCREs shall be improved and included in the collective agreement.

Admail: The payments, time values and rules of delivery for admail shall be standardized. The rate of payment shall be 2.3 cents per piece with a maximum weight of 230 grams, 4.0 cents up to 500 grams, 5.0 cents for pieces of a width between 6 and 9 inches. Oversized admail shall be paid at 10.0 cents up to 1000 grams and 15.0 cents up to 2000 grams.

It’s Time for Equality

Everyone in the postal service knows that the work of RSMCs requires the same levels of skill, effort and responsibility as that of Urban Operations workers. Canada Post must acknowledge its legal and moral responsibility to provide pay equity to RSMCs. Your Negotiating Committee is working hard to explain to the employer why our demands are just, reasonable and necessary. In order to convince management we will need the active support of all RSMCs. The time for equality is now.

In solidarity,

Donald Lafleur
4th National Vice-President and Chief Negotiator

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Union Response to Employer Global Offer (RSMC)

May 7, 2012

RSMC Negotiations 2012 / Global Offer

 

The Union welcomes the efforts the employer has made in its global offer to achieve a negotiated settlement of the collective agreement with the Union. Unfortunately, while the employer’s offer moves the parties closer to a negotiated settlement the Union believes that there have to be both modifications and additions made to the employer’s language proposals in order for the issues facing the parties to be resolved without the parties using their respective Canada Labour Code rights of lockout/strike.

In general terms the Union has a number of concerns with the employer’s global offer:

  1. It fails to adequately address the Union demands for pay equity, fairness and progress;

  2. It fails to provide solutions to some of the work floor problems faced by the membership on a daily basis;

  3. It fails to provide all the benefits currently enjoyed by all or a majority of the unionized employees at Canada Post; and;

  4. When it does address the benefits enjoyed by all or a majority of the unionized employees it does so through language which differs, sometimes significantly, from the language found in the other collective agreements.

With these general concerns in play the Union has either accepted the employer’s proposed language, revised it or added to it. In doing so it has followed the format found in the employer’s global offer. Similar to the employer’s global offer the Union’s proposed collective agreement language may be found in the tab that corresponds to the article number containing the issue addressed by the language.

The language found in the various tabs is to take precedence over the general overview.

Any provision of the collective agreement, as amended by the awards of arbitrator Keller, that is not referenced in the Union’s global offer is to remain status quo.

As this offer is a global offer, no single item or group of items may be accepted without the acceptance of all other items in the global offer.

The Union reserves the right to modify or add to its demands if the parties are unable to reach a negotiated settlement.

The Union also notes that at the time this global offer was being prepared the Union had not received nor reviewed the text that the employer intended to use in printing the collective agreement as amended by arbitrator Keller. Therefore, if the employer’s intended text does not reflect arbitrator Keller’s decision of April 3, 2012 or the language agreed to by the parties following the issuance of the September 29, 2011 and October 26, 2011 awards the Union reserves the right to propose additional changes to the collective agreement.

Collective Agreement Length

The Union proposes a collective agreement that will begin on January 1, 2012 and end on January 31, 2015 (see clause 36.01).

Compensation

As previously indicated the Union believes that the parties should use this round of negotiations to eliminate the inequalities in compensation that exist both within the RSMC bargaining unit and between the RSMC and employees in other bargaining units at Canada Post. The Union does not believe that the employer’s compensation proposal and regional wage rates meets the Union’s objectives. Given that no other bargaining unit at Canada Post is paid in this manner, the Union is therefore rejecting this proposal.

It should be noted that, as the employer is refusing to meet in regard to the reconciliation fund payments and the impact of Arbitrator Keller’s decision, it is very difficult to discuss issues relating to compensation in a serious way.

A letter to Mr. Sylvain Bordeleau in this regard is included in this binder.

The Union is proposing the establishment of national hourly rates that will be applied to all employees based on their years of service. This proposal is in line with the provisions of other collective agreements at Canada Post. The result of the Union’s proposal is that as of February 1, 2014 the maximum hourly rate payable to RSMC employees will equal the maximum hourly rate payable to Group 2 employees under the Urban Operations collective agreement. The Union is also proposing that relief employees receive a supplemental payment in addition to the hourly rate to which they are entitled. These proposals may be found in clause 33.01.

The Union has also proposed language for the implementation of the new hourly rates in clauses 33.02 and 33.03.

In its global offer the employer made proposals concerning the payment of vehicle expenses and the recovery of overpayments. While the Union agrees in principle with the proposals being made by the employer in these two areas it has some concerns with the proposed language. It has therefore included in this offer (at clauses 33.05 and 33.06) language to address these two issues.

The Union also believes that employees should receive payment for all hours worked at Canada Post. It is therefore proposing a number of changes to the collective agreement that will see RSMC employees paid at the applicable hourly rate for all hours worked to a maximum of eight and at overtime rates for hours worked in excess of eight hours per day. The Union’s proposed language may be found at tab 13.

There are also three other issues that address the compensation received by RSMC employees. The first of these is isolated post allowances. These allowances, which are included in the other collective agreements at Canada Post, are meant to address the very specific living conditions that employees experience in these locations. To address these specific conditions the Union is proposing the language found at tab 42

The Union is also proposing that RSMC employees be protected against the negative impacts of inflation by including cost of living allowances in the agreement. This proposal is also being made to ensure that equity is maintained. The Union’s proposal may be found in clause 33.07.

The third issue is the rate of compensation when an employee works on a Statutory Holiday. The Union is proposing that the rate of pay on such occasions be at double time (clause 16.03).

In closing this section the Union would note in general terms that prior to resolving the compensation issues being dealt with in this round of negotiations will have to determine, in approximate terms, how much money will be available from the reconciliation of the financial cap for distribution in 2011.

Benefits

The Union agrees that RSMC employees should be entitled to a long term disability program (LTD). However, unlike the proposal being made by the employer, the Union believes that the LTD to which RSMC employees are entitled should be the same program as that provided to other unionized employees at Canada Post. It is therefore proposing the language found in clauses 22.05 & 22.06 and Appendix “new 1”.

The Union is also proposing changes to the dental plan to provide yearly updates to the applicable dental fee guide (clause 22.03) and coverage for all route holders and permanent relief employees by the Extended Health Care Plan (EHCP) (clause 22.04).

The Union wishes to ensure that all permanent employees are covered under the drug plan, including those that are scheduled to work less than 12 hours per week.

The Union also does not agree with the employer proposal to provide a defined contribution pension plan to future RSMC employees. The Union has therefore maintained status quo language for clause 22.01.

Health and Safety and Workload

As indicated during these negotiations the Union does not believe that the employer has made out its case for proposing that RSMC employees be entitled to a lesser uniform entitlement or a different style of uniform than that provided to urban operation employees. It also does not agree that an employee who is scheduled to work less than twelve (12) hours per week should be disentitled from receiving a full uniform entitlement. It is therefore proposing the language found at tab 25.

As regards the accommodation of employees to the point of undue hardship the Union agrees that there should be language in the collective agreement to identify the rights of employees who require accommodation and a process to deal with requests made by employees. However, it has a number of concerns with the employer’s proposed language, including its suggestions that accommodation should occur in line with the employer’s policy document rather than the provisions of the Canadian Human Rights Act and that the employer may implement accommodation measures at its sole discretion.

Rather than agree to such language the Union is proposing language that modifies the language found in the urban operation collective agreement on the basis of the RSMC workplace reality (see clause 39.01).

The Union believes that the introduction of employer supplied right hand drive vehicles should be an issue addressed through negotiations. To that end it has made a number of proposals concerning providing of these vehicles. These proposals may be found in clauses 32.01 to 32.06 inclusive.

There are also other health and safety proposals included in the Union’s package of demand that were not mentioned in the employer’s global offer. The Union continues to believe that these proposals are necessary and is therefore proposing language for the following matters: paid injury on duty leave (clause 20.01), specific health and safety protections (see article 24), boot and glove allowance (clause 25.05), a Route Measurement System (article 11) and regularly scheduled rest and lunch breaks (clause 13.02).

A transparent and fair Route Measurement System is directly tied to an hourly pay rate and also to the removal of the Transition Committee.

The Union welcomes the commitments made by the employer in its proposed Appendix “New 5” language, which, among other things, confirms the employer’s commitment to building a harassment free workplace, to investigate complaints of harassment and to include the matters of human rights and conflict management in the training program it will be developing if the changes being proposed for article 26 are accepted. The part of the employer’s proposal that the Union does not agree with is the part that indicates that harassment complaints will be conducted under the employer’s harassment policy, which, as the employer notes, may be amended from time by time by the employer.

Rather than having complaints dealt with by a policy that may be amended unilaterally by the employer the Union would prefer that any investigative process be included in the collective agreement. It is therefore proposing the deletion of the second paragraph of the employer’s proposed Appendix “new 5” and the addition of protections against harassment (see language found at Appendix new 3 and article 41).

The Union also does not agree with the manner in which the employer has dealt with changes to the types of services provided to Canada Post customers. It is therefore proposing (clause 24.12) that the employer discontinue the use of the Traffic Safety Assessment Tool (TSAT) and address RSMC health and safety issues through the application of article 24 and consultation with the Union.

Paid and Unpaid Leave *

There are a number of paid leaves that are found in every other collective agreement at Canada Post except for the RSMC collective agreement. In order to rectify these inequities the Union is proposing generally that these paid leaves be added to the RSMC agreement. It is therefore proposing language for increased vacation leave and pre-retirement leave (clauses 15.01 – 15.12 inclusive), paid sick leave (clauses 17.01 – 17.10), special leave (clauses 19.01 and 19.06), parental leave (clauses 18.04 & 18.08), leave for Union business (clauses 21.02, 21.03 and 21.04) and court leave (clause 19.06).

The Union has also applied clause number 19.05 to the seven (7) day yearly entitlement to personal days awarded to each employee by arbitrator Keller.

Relief

The Union agrees with the employer proposal to create permanent relief employee positions, with employees filling these positions being entitled to all the provisions of the collective agreement. However, the Union is also seeking in these negotiations the deletion of any reference to replacement workers in the collective agreement and an increase in the utilization of on-call relief employees. In the Union’s opinion a requirement that an employee provide his or her own replacement is the last vestige of the employee’s previous contractor status which should be removed from the collective agreement, with the employer taking its responsibility, as it does in every other collective agreement at Canada Post, to cover absences with bargaining unit employees hired and trained by the employer.

The Union is therefore proposing two different types of relief employees; permanent relief employees, as suggested by the employer, and on-call relief employees as currently found in the collective agreement. The language being proposed by the Union at article 40 and Appendix “E” provides, among other things, procedures for determining the number of permanent relief and on-call relief employees in each installation, the usage of such relief employees and the contractual entitlements and benefits to which they would be entitled.

Technological Change *

In the interest arbitration award of October 26, 2011 the Union was awarded the language it had proposed for “technological change”, with one exception. In his award the arbitrator deleted the proposed language for clause 37.11, which provided specific protections against adverse effects applicable to the RSMC work situation. As no rationale was provided by the arbitrator for the deletion of these protections, and as protections specific to bargaining unit work situations are found in all the other collective agreements at Canada Post, the Union is proposing language that incorporates such specific protections. The insertion of this language will require concordance changes to the language that follows. The Union’s proposed language may be found at clause 37.11.

Training

The Union agrees generally with the changes being proposed by the employer for article 26 and the deletions of clauses 12.09 and 12.10, although these agreement are premised on the understanding that any training required by the employer will form part of an employee’s work day and be paid accordingly. The Union has proposed changes to the employer’s proposal for article 26 to reflect the Union’s demand for a national hourly rate and to make the selection of peer trainers a consultative procedure.

Staffing

The Union is proposing a number of changes to the current staffing procedures. Included in these proposals is an expansion of the area of eligibility when a vacant route or permanent relief position occurs and the inclusion of permanent relief employees in the bidding process. This latter inclusion echoes a proposal being made by the employer. These proposals may be found at tab 12. Note that clause 12.02 has been moved to Article 11.

The Union has also addressed the concern expressed by the employer concerning the effects of a national transfer entitlement by providing a mechanism to cover a vacant route if there is a delay in the successful candidate assuming the new route or position (see clause 12.09).

As well as proposing seniority based system for the filling of vacant routes and permanent relief positions the Union is proposing a similar seniority based procedure for filling routes that are changed or created through restructures. The Union’s proposed language may be found at tab 11.

The Union also believes that the collective agreement must contain language that restricts the employer’s right to contract out the work now being performed by RSMC employees. To that end it is proposing language similar in nature to that now applied to motorized mail couriers through Appendix “I” of the urban operations collective agreement (see Appendix New 2).

Discipline

The Union agrees to the language proposed by the employer for clause 10.01 except for one change to bring the French and English texts into concordance.

The Union agrees with the employer proposal to add language pertaining to a verbal reprimand to clause 10.02. It has also amended clause 10.02 by adding the language found in clause 10.02 (a) of the Urban Operation agreement.

The Union has added the first paragraph of clause 10.04 to reflect that an employee issued a twenty-four hour notice must be advised of his or her right to union representation.

The Union accepts the language proposed by the employer for the second and third paragraphs of clause 10.04 except it has amended the English text of the third paragraph in order that the English and French texts provide the same entitlement.

The Union has added new clauses 10.06 (confidentiality), 10.07 (No Right to Discipline) and 10.08 (release for incapacity).

Grievance Process

The Union accepts the employer’s proposal for clauses 9.06 (Time Limits on Grievances) & 9.13 (Atlantic Provinces and Province of Ontario Arbitration lists) and letter new 1 (pay notification on pay stub), except that it is proposing that letter new 1 be included in the collective agreement as an appendix (Appendix New 4).

It is also proposing the addition of Denis Nadeau to the national arbitrator list (see clause 9.14).

Union/Management Meetings

The Union has not accepted the employer’s proposed language for clause 7.06 as no other collective agreement at Canada Post requires the applicable Union to assume the payment of wages when one of its representatives is representing other employees at consultation meetings, grievance investigations or grievance hearings. The Union proposal concerning payment for union representatives attending union/management meetings may be found at clause 7.06.

The Union accepts the employer’s proposed language for clauses 7.07 & 7.08, except that it has removed the words “under the preceding clause” from clause 7.07.

The Union has added clause 7.09 which incorporates the language of clause 8.08 of the Urban Operations agreement.

The Union also proposes the abolition of the TSAT. We feel that these matters can be dealt with under Article 24 by the parties.

Union Rights

The employer has proposed language concerning access to non-public areas of facilities. In so doing it has limited or restricted access in a manner not found in other collective agreements at Canada Post. These limitations or restrictions include the removal of reference to “local officers not on post office duty, the exclusion of offices not directly owned or leased by the employer, the requirement that at least forty-eight (48) hours notice be provided by the Union representative requesting access and the right of the employer to deny access on the basis of operational requirements or the failure to provide proper notification.

The Union notes that none of these restrictions or exclusions are applied to the language of the other collective agreements at Canada Post, some of which a have been recently re-negotiated.

The Union is therefore proposing language that is similar to that found in all other collective agreements at Canada Post (see clauses 3.02 & 3.03).

The Union also believes that union representatives should not be hindered or prevented from performing their responsibilities under the provisions of article 9. It is therefore proposing changes to clauses 9.04 and 9.09 so that union representatives are not financially penalized or otherwise hindered or prevented from performing their legitimate duties.

Final Offer Selection

The Union does not agree with the employer’s proposal concerning final offer selection, as it believes that the adoption of such a dispute resolution mechanism will only serve as an irritant in the labour relations between the parties. We also feel that the recent experiences with the Urban Op erations collective bargaining and between other employers and unions show that this approach to dispute resolution does not work.

It is proposing new language concerning the revision and the extension of the collective agreement (see clauses 36.02, 36.03 and 36.04).

Housekeeping

The Union agrees with the employer proposals to remove references to the financial cap and interest arbitration from the collective agreement. Its proposal concerning situations that develop at the expiry of the collective agreement are dealt with in the previous section.

The Union agrees with the proposals being made by the employer for clauses 9.21 & 33.04 and Appendices“D”, “F”, “G” and “H”. The other changes being proposed by the employer may be dealt with in other Union proposals. Agreement in regard to Appendix F is conditional on achieving a national hourly rate of pay.

The current printing of the collective agreement includes as an addendum the Memorandum of Agreement signed by the parties prior to the collective agreement being negotiated. This addendum, among other things, establishes the processes by which independent contractors became employees of Canada Post. As the memorandum has become moot through the passage of time the Union is proposing that it not be included as an addendum when the new collective agreement is printed.

In addition, it is important to draw your attention to clauses 40.12 and 11.04 of this offer. Clause 40.12 lists clause 8.01 as a clause applying to on call relief employees. Clause 11.04 contains similar language to clause 47.04 of the Urban Operations collective agreement, but the words “and data” are also included. It is important to note that in both cases, the additions to the language have been inserted for purposes of additional clarity in the hopes of avoiding further disputes between the parties. In the Union’s view, on call relief employees are already entitled to claim their full continuous service as defined in Article 8 once they become permanent RSMC employees, and the wording of 47.04 in the Urban Operations agreement already requires the employer to provide all data relevant to a restructure. In both cases, the additional text is included without prejudice to CUPW’s positions on these important matters.

The Union welcomes any questions the employer may have about this global offer

2012-05-07_glbl_offer_rsmc_en

 

 

 

April 27, 2012 - 12:00

RSMC Negotiations 2012 / Fact Sheet

2012 RSMC Negotiations - Fact Sheet 3

 

CUPW is in bargaining for a new collective agreement for Rural and Suburban Mail Couriers (RSMCs) who work at Canada Post. About 70 percent of RSMCs are women. They do much the same work as letter carriers, who are mostly men, but as a rule, receive much less pay and inferior treatment. RSMCs want and deserve pay equity, as well as the same rights and benefits as letter carriers. They are determined to negotiate an end to pay inequality and other inequities in the current round of bargaining. This includes inequities between RSMC and urban workers, and within the RSMC bargaining unit.

What is pay equity?

Pay equity is a fundamental human right.

It is also the law. Section 11 of the Canadian Human Rights Act (CHRA) states:

“It is a discriminatory practice for an employer to establish or maintain differences in wages between male and female employees employed in the same establishment who are performing work of equal value.”

Pay equity requires that some federally regulated employers pay male and female employees the same wage when they are performing work of equal or comparable value. It is the right to equal pay for work of equal value.

The CHRA says that an employer cannot reduce wages to achieve pay equity.

Are Canada Post and its workers covered by the pay equity law?

Yes. Canada Post and its workers are covered by the CHRA and its pay equity provision.1In fact, the Supreme Court of Canada recently ruled in favour of clerical and administrative workers at Canada Post in a pay equity case filed by the Public Service Alliance of Canada.

How is pay equity or equal pay for work of equal value determined?

The value of work is calculated using job evaluations which consider four factors: skill, effort, responsibility and working conditions. Most job evaluations use a point system that assigns a numerical value to each factor. The points for the four factors are then totalled to establish the value of a job. Jobs are compared based on their total value. This allows jobs that are predominantly done by men to be compared to jobs that are predominantly done by women in order to determine whether work of equal value is being compensated equally.

Under the law, only people working within the same establishment may be compared. An establishment includes “all employees of the employer subject to a common personnel and wage policy, whether or not such policy is administered centrally.”2

Who is responsible for ensuring pay equity?

According to the federal government’s Pay Equity Information Guide, “Even in unionized environments, section 11 of the CHRA makes federally-regulated private sector employers and commercial Crown Corporations solely responsible for ensuring that no gender-based wage discrimination exists in their establishments.”

That said, the government believes that unions and employers “are jointly responsible for the outcomes of collective bargaining, including establishing wage rates” and that achieving pay equity therefore requires “a collaborative approach”. It says that unions and employers can use bargaining to achieve pay equity.

The Canadian Human Rights Commission (CHRC) also encourages employers to work with employees and their unions to close the wage gap, pointing out that such an approach can ensure compliance with legislation without causing unnecessary confrontation, disruption and costs. The CHRC recognizes that the pay equity complaint process is often expensive and can take a very long time.

It took 28 years for the PSAC pay equity complaint to be resolved. Canada Post poured a great deal of money into fighting against the complaint launched by PSAC on behalf of clerical and administrative workers at Canada Post. In the end, PSAC won its pay equity case, although it had to take its fight all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada. It would have been significantly less expensive if Canada Post had just settled the matter in 1983.

Does Canada Post support pay equity?

In 2009, David Olsen, Assistant General Counsel for Legal Affairs at Canada Post, stated “I will repeat, just so there’s no misunderstanding, that our organization unequivocally supports the principle of equal pay for work of equal value.”

In practice, Canada Post has not supported pay equity nor does it like the pay equity provisions in the CHRA. According to Olsen, “Section 11 of the Canadian Human Rights Act is poorly drafted” and it“has routinely and strategically been leveraged by trade unions as a means by which to effectively reopen collective agreements that they themselves have entered into with employers, in order to then seek additional payment on behalf of female-dominated groups in their union, a second kick at the can, if you like, that flies in the face of the fundamental sanctity of collective bargaining.”3

This Canada Post spokesperson ignores the fact that the corporation has a legal obligation to ensure that men and women are paid equally for work of equal value. He also seems to forget that Canada Post has not pushed for pay equity at the bargaining table, and that it has often relied on back-to-work legislation to impose its agenda. Arguably, this flies in the face of the fundamental sanctity of collective bargaining.

What is CUPW’s position?

CUPW is determined to negotiate pay equity or equal pay for work of equal value. Pay equity is a key demand in the current round of bargaining for RSMCs. Canada Post has historically discriminated against RSMCs based on their gender. RSMCs have been a predominantly female group for years. Currently, about 70 % of RSMCs are women.4 70 % of letter carriers are men.5

CUPW did not represent RSMCs until 2004, only urban postal workers. The union used urban negotiations in 2003 to bring RSMCs in as employees with rights under an eight-year contract. This collective agreement provided for “re-openers” every two years, allowing Canada Post and CUPW to negotiate improvements based on a fixed amount of money. As a result, the union has negotiated improved wages, rights and benefits for RSMCs over the past eight years, but there is not yet equality between RSMCs and urban postal workers.

CUPW has lived by the terms of the RSMC collective agreement it entered into eight years ago, but the expiry date on that contract has passed and the union is currently bargaining for a new agreement that includes pay equity.

During the negotiations process, a CUPW pay equity complaint would not likely be helpful as it might sidetrack the parties into a lengthy court battle. Also, the corporation might refuse to negotiate pay equity if this issue was being considered in another forum (i.e. if it were the subject of a CHRC complaint by CUPW).

The union is determined to negotiate an end to pay inequality and other inequities in the current round of bargaining.

Ending inequities within the RSMC unit

RSMCs are still living with the legacy of the days when they were individual contractors pitted against each other by management. Just as there is no equality between RSMCs and urban workers, there is also no fairness between RSMCs when it comes to the hourly rate or workload.

CUPW is demanding equal wages and benefits as well as a work measurement system that will assist the union in ensuring that workload is reasonable and that our members are paid for all the work they do. It will also help us protect members from bad route restructures.


1. Most federal public sector workers are no longer covered by the pay equity provisions of the CHRA, but Canada Post workers are. The legislation which removed coverage under the CHRA, the Public Sector Equitable Compensation Act, applies to federal employees and federal agencies falling under Schedule I, IV and V of the Financial Administration Act. Canada Post is a federal agency but it falls under Schedule III, Part 2.

2. Department of Justice, Equal Wages Guidelines, 1986.

3.Canada. Standing Committee on the Status of Women, Evidence, 40th Parliament, 2nd session, May 28, 2009 (http://www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx? DocId=3933600&Language=E&Mode=1&Parl=40&Ses=2, Date accessed: March 14, 2012,)

4. Canada Post Corporation, RSMC Demographics, October 9, 2009.

5. Canada Post Corporation, 2010/2011 CUPW Negotiations, Labour Cost #3, Headcount: Gender by class, Data as of December 31, 2009.

Putting an end to discrimination at Canada Post - Equality and pay equity now (Fact Sheet 3)

(Click on above image for this Document in PDF)

 

April 27, 2012 - 11:00

RSMC Negotiations 2012 / Fact Sheet

2012 RSMC Negotiations - Fact Sheet 2

 

Prior to 2004, RSMCs had no rights and no benefits. Their working lives, wages, and futures were subject to the whim of Canada Post.

Under section 13.5 of the Canada Post Corporation (CPC) Act, RSMCs were “contractors” who had no collective bargaining or other rights. RSMCs had to bid on their routes. They were often told to accept a contract for less money than before or else they would lose their route and their job. After they deducted their expenses from their earnings, many earned minimum wage or less. RSMCs got tired of their unfair treatment and waged a long battle to gain rights.

On January 1, 2004, RSMCs became employees of Canada Post. From 2002 to 2003, they signed membership cards for CUPW to represent them and bargain for their first collective agreement. Canada Post did not just “give”RSMCs employment status, access to the pension plan, a grievance procedure or any rights. Rather, these gains were made because RSMC bargaining was tied to the urban operations bargaining. Canada Post knew that urban operations members had the right to strike and were not afraid to use it to gain rights for all postal workers. Free collective bargaining combined with the right to strike resulted in the first ever RSMC collective agreement.

Gains made in 2004 bargaining

  • A financial formula for guaranteed funding of improvements was agreed on: CPC was required to contribute $29 million in the first year, and an additional $15 million each year thereafter, to finance improvements in wages, benefits and working conditions. These were negotiated in a series of re-openers.

  • RSMCs no longer had to compete with other bidders to keep their routes and their jobs.

  • A grievance arbitration process was put in place to protect the rights of RSMCs.

  • RSMCs received two weeks paid vacation leave in 2004 and three weeks paid vacation leave in 2005.

  • Canada Post was required to pay the employer’s share of the CPP/QPP. Prior to 2004, RSMCs were required to pay for both employer and employee shares. The average RSMC gained approximately $876.00 from this.

  • Most RSMCs became covered by the Canada Post Pension Plan.

  • RSMCs gained coverage under Workers’ Compensation.

  • RSMCs gained coverage under Employment Insurance.

  • A joint, six-person Transition Committee, with three CUPW and three CPC representatives was formed.

  • RSMCs gained protections against unjust discipline and dismissal.

  • The agreement outlined a standard vehicle allowance of $0.42/kilometre, for the first 5,000 kilometres and $0.36 for each additional kilometre per year.

  • In 2004, RSMCs received an increase in wages of $225.00 for each daily hour designated on their route.

  • RSMCs also obtained the right to unpaid parental leaves, paid statutory holidays, health and safety protection under the provisions of the Canada Labour Code, and protection from harassment in the workplace under the Canadian Human Rights Act.

  • In 2005, RSMCs were covered under the CUPW childcare fund, a vision and hearing-aid plan, and provided with improved bereavement leave.

  • Canada Post was required to pay 1/3 of a cent (per scheduled hour for all RSMC employee routes) into the CUPW education fund as of January 1, 2004, 2/3 of a cent as of January 1, 2005 and three cents as of January 1, 2011.

2006 re-opener

  • March 1, 2006: An increase of $95.00 per daily scheduled hours of work.

  • January 1, 2007: An increase of $95.00 per daily scheduled hours of work.

  • On January 1, 2007 and every year afterwards, RSMCs received a non-taxable boot allowance of $30.00 per daily scheduled hours of work. Relief employees were also entitled a boot allowance

  • Effective October 1, 2007 all RSMCs with six months of service became entitled to the dental plan.

  • Effective September 1, 2005, the vehicle allowance increased from $0.42 to $0.45. Effective April 1, 2006, it increased by five cents to $0.50 for the first five thousand kilometres driven in a year.

  • Canada Post was required to hire 300 relief employees.

  • In offices without relief employees, CPC was prohibited from disciplining RSMCs who were unable to provide a replacement worker after making every reasonable effort to do so.

  • In installations where relief employees were employed, vacation leave became granted on the basis of seniority.

  • Relief workers became covered by certain provisions of the collective agreement.

  • A route management study was initiated. The Transition Committee became responsible for studying six elements of the work performed by RSMCs, including delivery to community, group and rural mailboxes, delivery and sortation to business points of call, and driving time. This resulted in $4.1 million being added to RSMC wages.

  • A clause was added to ensure union representatives do not suffer a loss of pay while performing activities related to health and safety during working hours.

  • Vacant routes were filled on the basis of seniority from route holders within the installation.

  • New employees were entitled to receive up to five days of paid training.

  • Canada Post was required to make adjustments in the compensation paid to routes in a particular installation when they introduced a new route in the installation with a higher rate of compensation.

2008 re-opener

  • Effective September 1, 2008, RSMCs received a wage increase ($80.00 yearly per daily hour) and on January 1, 2009, an additional increase ($32.00 yearly per daily hour).

  • The lowest paid routes received an additional, substantial wage increase.

  • Wages were paid bi-weekly instead of once per month.

  • Certain RSMCs in Alberta, the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, and the Yukon received additional increases.

  • Vehicle expenses increased to $0.52/kilometre for the first 5,000 kilometres a year and $0.46 cents for additional kilometres beyond 5,000 kilometres a year.

  • Two personal days per year of paid leave.

  • Canada Post was required to provide on-call relief employees (OCRE) to cover all absences in major urban centres. This forced the corporation to create new OCRE positions.

  • RSMCs in other locations received a replacement training allowance of $250.00 per year if they were required to train a new replacement because Canada Post had hired their replacement as an employee.

  • Qualified route holders were able to fill vacant routes within 50 kilometres of their present installation on the basis of seniority.

  • Canada Post guaranteed that its intent to introduce “sequencing of mail” would not affect RSMCs during 2008 or 2009.

  • Changes to a route resulting in an adjustment of wages (Appendix A) were implemented once per calendar year, based on the actual changes to a route. In addition, adjustments were made to the amount payable if the increase or decrease in the total number of points of call or total kilometres exceeded 5%. Payments were retroactive to the date on which the change exceeded 5%.

2010 re-opener

  • RSMCs became entitled to paid leave when they are required to serve on a jury.

  • RSMCs became entitled to four weeks of vacation leave after the completion of ten years of employment.

  • Canada Post became required to fill vacant positions by seniority from applications received from members working within 75 kilometres of the vacancy. Both route holders and On Call Relief Employees within the area of eligibility are entitled to submit applications for the vacant position, although route holders are to be given the first opportunity.

  • Canada Post’s Corporate Team Incentive was applied to RSMC members effective December 31, 2011.

  • There was a new provision that CUPW and Canada Post may, through consultation at the local level, create additional On Call Relief positions if the local situation requires such additional positions.

  • RSMCs who are entitled to maternity, parental or adoption leave under the Employment Insurance Act or the Quebec Parental Insurance Plan, became entitled to receive an allowance that“tops-up” their wages to 93% of their weekly wage for the period of coverage.

  • As of December 1, 2011, RSMC route holders who are scheduled for 12 hours or more per week (see Schedule A) were entitled to a drug plan.

  • RSMCs became entitled to short term disability insurance to cover absences due to illness or accident, in some circumstances up to 30 weeks. The number of personal days increased to seven per year. Five days per year can be carried over to the following year at an RSMC’s request, up to a maximum of 12 personal days per year.

  • Canada Post became required to negotiate with the union about the introduction of technological changes that may affect RSMC members and eliminate any adverse effects arising from the introduction of such technological changes.

  • RSMCs received retroactive wage increases: $107.00 and $68.00 for each daily hour of work, effective as of January 1, 2010 and January 1, 2011 respectively.

  • There was an additional wage increase for the lower paid routes, bringing the minimum hourly rate up to $15.55 in 2011.

  • There were improvements for on call relief employees. They became eligible for an annual boot allowance of $240.00, up from $180.00. As well, they received an annual retention allowance of $1000 for remaining on call for a year.

  • RSMCs received increased payments for householders under 500 grams as of January 2010, doubling the amount previously received and providing an average annual increase of $1000 per member. New tasks with corresponding monetary values were added to Appendix A (Changes to a route). Pre-existing monetary values were improved.

So what gains have RSMCs made in 8 years?

  • Improved wages

  • Increased vehicle allowance payments

  • The Canada Post Pension Plan

  • Access to Employment Insurance, Workers’ Compensation and CPP/QPP

  • Seniority

  • Paid vacation leave

  • Paid personal days

  • Short term disability insurance

  • A grievance procedure

  • A dental plan

  • Bereavement leave

  • Parental leave top-up

  • Boot and glove allowance

  • Relief employees

  • A hearing and vision plan

  • Protections from unfair discipline

  • A drug plan

  • Health and safety protections

  • Access to a childcare fund and education fund

  • Protections from technological change

  • Union rights

Free collective bargaining - a better deal for RSMCs!

In short, RSMCs have made significant progress over the past 8 years. This is because the union, RSMCs and urban members, fought long and hard for improvements. But more needs to be done. This is why in 2012, rural, urban and suburban postal workers are united and determined to obtain equal pay and the same benefits and rights. It’s time for fairness, respect and progress.

RSMCs have made gains (Fact Sheet 2)

(Click on above image for this Document in PDF)

 

 

March 9, 2012

RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No 09

Employer Presents Global Offer

 

On March 7, 2012, CPC presented their first Global Offer. Here are the major elements of their proposal. Further information and analysis will be available in the near future.

Duration of the Collective Agreement

• 4-year collective agreement ending December 31, 2015.

Compensation

• January 1, 2012, all employees receive 3% raise.
• During 2012 the employees will receive the reconciliation payments as per the Keller award.
• On January 1, 2013, a new compensation model to be introduced:
o An activity-based system based on 100% basic hourly rate of $18.42 per hour.
o Regional rates so that the basic hourly rate may fluctuate by 28% (example: Fort McMurray is $22.10 and PEI and rural Saskatchewan is $16.95).

• All employees with pay of more than the basic hourly rate for their region will be red circled and receive a lump sum of 1% on January 1st of 2013, 2014 and 2015.
• All other employees (who receive the basic hourly rate for their region) will receive 2% wage increases on January 1st of 2014 and 2015.
• New employees to receive 85% of the basic hourly rate for their region and reach 100% when they begin their sixth year of service.
• All On Call Relief Employees shall remain at 85% of the basic hourly rate for their region. Example: The rate for new employees and OCRE for Fort McMurray is $18.79 and PEI and rural Saskatchewan is $14.41).

• Effective January 1, 2014, there will be a ½ cent increase for householders.
• Recovery of overpayments over $50.00 to be made at 10% per pay.
• Vehicle expenses to be increased to CRA rate 60 days after the signing of the collective agreement or 60 days following any future change in the CRA rate.

Benefits

• Eliminate the defined benefit pension plan for future employees hired after the date of signing and replace with a defined contribution plan.
• Elimination of variable allowance from vacation pay.
• An Extended Disability program to cover 74 weeks of benefits paid at 70% of the basic hourly regional pay rate. Contributions to be paid 100% by CPC.

Health and Safety

• Effective January 1, 2013, eliminate the boot allowance and provide points for all employees to obtain boots approved by CPC.
• Provide a uniform to route holders with 12 hours per week or more and permanent relief based on a points system. The uniform and point system is different than that provided to urban
workers.

• Local consultation for employees returning on modified duties.
• Requirement for appropriate driver’s license to obtain right-hand drive vehicle if provided by CPC.

Relief

• Creation of a classification of permanent relief positions in offices with 16 or more RSMC routes.
• Permanent relief positions will be created in at least 64 installations.
• Permanent relief positions will be entitled to all benefits received by route holders.
• On Call Relief Employees will be used in 268 large and mid-sized installations. In smaller locations, representing 55% of RSMCs, employees will still be required to train and provide their own replacements to cover all absences.
• For On Call Relief Employees retention bonus of $250.00 to be paid quarterly provided employee works the entire quarter and at least on 15 occasions.
• Vacation bidding to be implemented in all offices with permanent or on-call relief.

Training

• Elimination of training for RSMCs when they obtain a new route.
• Five days of training for all new employees including three days on route.
• For in-office or self-study training employees will be paid $135.00 per day.
• Human rights training to be provided for all new employees.

Staffing

• Employees can perform portions on other routes and receive the basic hourly rate for their region with no compensation for overtime.
• Bidding by seniority in some circumstances during some restructures.
• Employer to notify union local of planned restructures and provide documentation at least five days prior to implementation.
• Local consultation during the route restructure process.

Union Rights

• The burden of proof rests with the Employer in arbitrations for disciplinary-related measures.
• Verbal reprimand not to be considered disciplinary measure.
• Time limits for group grievances to be extended to 60 days.
• New arbitrators added to the lists.
• Grievance number to be placed on pay stubs when they receive a payment resulting from a grievance.
• Local memorandum of agreements to be recorded in minutes.
• Local agreements subject to the grievance procedure.
• Local union representatives to remain on the payroll when executing duties.
• The union will reimburse the employer for all union leave with the exception of joint health and safety duties.
• Full-time union representatives to be granted access to non-public areas of all corporate-owned and leased post offices provided advance notice is provided.

Compulsory Final Offer Selection Arbitration Process

• Elimination of the legal right to strike and imposition of final offer selection arbitration process for all future rounds of collective bargaining.

Transition Committee

• Elimination of the Transition Committee without providing a route measurement system.

Financial Cap

• Removal of all references to the previous financial cap.

Major Improvements Necessary

As you can see there are major problems with this first Global Offer from CPC. Instead of providing equality and fairness, this offer creates differences between RSMCs from different regions. New employees will be penalized with inadequate pensions. In some cases, the pay rate will be even less than it is today, further widening the wage gap between RSMCs and Urban Workers. Your Negotiating Committee is currently preparing a comprehensive reply, which will address all of our demands. Members should miss no opportunity to show the employer that we will not accept to be treated as second-class workers. Our future is at stake. We are worth so much more than this offer.

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SHOP STEWARDS

Bring this information to the attention of the members during regular weekly shop floor
meetings.

Solidarity,

Donald Lafleur

4th National Vice-President & Chief Negotiator

2011-2015/Bulletin No. 9

RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No 9 -PDF


 

 

 

March 7, 2012

RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No 08

Employer Seeks Defined Contribution Pension Plan

Under the provisions of clause 22.01, RSMC members are entitled to a defined benefit pension plan, whereby each member and the employer make contributions to the plan during the member’s employment and the member becomes entitled to a guaranteed entitlement when he or she retires from Canada Post. All unionized employees at Canada Post are presently covered by a defined benefit pension plan.

The employer has notified us that it is proposing the introduction of a defined contribution pension plan into the RSMC agreement for new hires. Under a defined contribution pension plan, each member and the employer make defined contributions to the individual member’s plan, with the amount available upon retirement being dependent on the relative success of the investment strategy decided by the member.

The Union indicated that it was not prepared to accept a defined contribution pension plan.

Uniform Entitlements

The employer also provided information concerning its uniform proposal. Under the proposal, beginning January 1, 2013, RSMC members scheduled to work more than twelve (12) hours per week would be entitled to corporate uniforms based on a point system that is similar to that found in the Urban Operations collective agreement

The Negotiating Committee will provide a response to the employer once it has reviewed the employer’s proposal in detail. An initial comparison of the employer’s proposed clothing entitlement to that provided to Mail Service Couriers shows there are a number of differences, including the types and style of available clothing, the inclusion of a boot and shoe entitlement and the number of points that RSMC could use to obtain various clothing entitlements.

News Update

We just received the first “Global Offer” from CPC. The Negotiations Committee is meeting to review the offer. More information will be made available as developments occur. Members should continue to show their support for their demands by participating in local activities and keeping informed of events at negotiations.

Solidarity,

Donald Lafleur

4th National Vice-President & Chief Negotiator

2011-2015/Bulletin No. 8

 

RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No8 - PDF

 

February 28, 2012 - 11:30

RSMC Negotiations 2012 / Fact Sheet

2012 RSMC Negotiations - Fact Sheet 1

For decades, Rural and Suburban Mail Carriers (RSMCs) have performed work that is much the same as urban postal workers, but they have not received the same compensation or treatment.

RSMCs deliver the mail in rural and suburban areas. About 50 per cent of them work side by side with letter carriers and clerks. The rest work with rural postmasters. Approximately, 70 per cent of them are women.

RSMCs do work that requires the same or an equivalent level of skill, effort and responsibility as letter carriers. They have the same working conditions. The only significant difference between RSMCs and letter carriers is gender and location. Letter carriers work in urban and suburban settings and are predominantly male.

It is simply not acceptable to treat RSMCs differently because they are a largely female and rural group of workers. These postal workers deserve equal pay and the same benefits and working conditions as urban postal workers.

The union believes that RSMC negotiations represent a historic opportunity to bridge the rural-urban divide that exists in our country, as well as the significant gender divide at Canada Post.

The long road to justice and equality

Our post office has a history of discriminating against RSMCs.

1956: The Post Office Act requires that rural route contracts over $10,000 be publicly tendered. Rural and suburban mail couriers get to keep their routes as long as their contracts do not exceed $10,000.

1975-1980: After two decades, many rural and suburban mail couriers can't pay their work-related expenses and live on contracts worth $10,000. They are forced to take less than $10,000 or see their contracts go to public tender.

1975-1980: During debates on the Canada Post Corporation Act (CPC Act), the Postmaster General argues for a section to prevent rural and suburban mail couriers from being employees or dependent contractors. He says this is necessary for financial reasons. He also promises to protect rural and suburban mail couriers and substantially increase the amount they're allowed to make before their contracts go to tender.

1981: The federal government passes the CPC Act. Section 13 (5) prevents rural and suburban mail couriers from being considered employees with collective bargaining rights and other rights under the Canada Labour Code. There is no provision ensuring that rural and suburban mail couriers get to keep routes under $10,000—just the Postmaster General's earlier promises.

1986: The Association of Rural Route Mail Carriers (ARRMC) applies for standing at Canada Labour Relations Board (CLRB) hearings on bargaining units at Canada Post. The Association argues its members should be part of the Letter Carriers Union of Canada.

1987: The CLRB finds that rural and suburban mail couriers are employees under the Canada Labour Code, with associated rights to unionize and bargain.

1987: During the CLRB hearings, Canada Post announces all contracts will be opened for bidding.

1987: The Federal Court of Appeal (FC) overturns the CLRB decision on the grounds that the Board did not have jurisdiction to override Parliament. It says that Parliament specifically included Section 13 (5) in the CPC Act to prevent rural and suburban mail couriers from being considered as employees. The court notes that the CLRB did not look at whether the CPC Act violates the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and says that this issue will 'have to be urged in another forum.'

1989: The court grants the Attorney General of Canada's motion to dismiss a Charter challenge by rural and suburban mail couriers. The motion says that employment status is not a prohibited ground of discrimination under the Charter.

1990: The court grants another government motion to dismiss a Charter challenge by the mail couriers: that the CPC Act is discriminatory on the basis of sex and rural residency. The court says that the residency argument is just a disguised attempt to raise the issue of occupational status. It also rules there is no evidence to ground a sex discrimination claim. The cards are stacked against the rural postal workers. They don't have the data to prove sex discrimination, and they are unable to appeal the decision because they have no money.

1996-1997: The Organization of Rural Route Mail Couriers (ORRMC) takes over where the ARRMC left off. The ORRMC wants basic bargaining rights, not just better contracts that can be changed at the whim of the government or Canada Post. The group calls for the elimination of Section 13 (5) of the CPC Act. CUPW agrees to help the ORRMC.

1998: The ORRMC launches a political and community campaign to eliminate Section 13 (5) of the CPC Act and improve their conditions of work. They have no rights, no benefits and inhumane working conditions. Canada Post frequently tells them, if they don't like it, they can quit.

2000: Members of Parliament from all parties support a private member's bill calling for the repeal of Section 13 (5). The bill almost passes second reading in the House of Commons. The vote is 114 to 110.

2002-2004: Section 13 (5) of the CPC Act remains, preventing rural and suburban mail carriers from being considered employees. CUPW signs up rural and suburban mail carriers as members and negotiates the contracting in of carriers as employees as of January 2004. The union also negotiates an eight-year collective agreement for RSMCs in order to get Canada Post to finally bring in RSMCs as employees with rights under a contract. The collective agreement provides for 're-openers' every two years, allowing Canada Post and CUPW to negotiate improvements based on a financial formula providing for a net increase in labour costs of $652 million during the eight years. As unionized workers, RSMCs have basic rights and a contract that provides clear rules and improved wages.

2004-2011: While RSMCs have basic rights and improved conditions of work, they are still not treated fairly or with respect by Canada Post. The corporation refuses to pay them for all the hours they work and systematically violates their collective agreement. As well, it is difficult to get Canada Post to seriously negotiate during 'reopeners' without the right to strike.

July to September 2011: The RSMC negotiations process begins in July with cross-country meetings with members to develop demands. In August and September, the demands are approved by 96.3% of members attending ratification votes.

October 13, 2011: CUPW gives Canada Post notice to bargain a new RSMC collective agreement in advance of the old contract expiring on December 31, 2011.

November 10, 2011: CUPW presents Canada Post with RSMC contract demands, including demands for equal pay and the same benefits and working conditions as urban postal workers.

2012: RSMCs finally get the right to strike, if necessary, to obtain a just collective agreement. They are concerned the Conservative government may side with Canada Post, as it did during urban postal negotiations, by removing this right and thus their ability to negotiate in any meaningful way.

2012: RSMCs are tired of being treated like second-class citizens. It is time to stop discriminating against RSMCs.

A typical work day

Full-time mail mobile letter carrier

Rural and Suburban mail carrier

• Arrive/Read order book • Arrive
• Get oversized, short and long mail • Get oversized, short and long mail
• Start sorting to line of delivery • Start sorting to line of delivery
• Drop off missorts, get personal contact items • Drop off or pile missorts, get personal contact items
• Pick up and sort turnaround mail • Pick up and sort turnaround mail (in some cases)
• Organize householders for that day • Organize householders for that day
• Pick up and line up parcels • Pull and pack sorted mail into box or bag
• Pull sorted mail • Get and line up parcels
• Write up or scan personal contact items • Write up or scan personal contact items (sometimes later)
• Pick-up, scan and line up late Priority Courier • Pick-up, scan and line up Priority Courier (in some cases)
• BREAK (10 minutes) • NO PAID BREAK
• Obtain and safety check Canada Post vehicle • Use own vehicle
• Load vehicle • Load vehicle
• Drive to route and deliver mail • Drive to route and deliver mail
• Drive to meal on route location
• Wash-up (5 minutes) • No wash-up
• LUNCH (30 minutes) • NO PAID LUNCH
• Drive to route and deliver • Still delivering
• BREAK (10 minutes) • NO PAID BREAK

• Continue delivering

• Still delivering
• Drop off carded parcels and signature items (undeliverables) at retail postal outlet or station • Drop off carded parcels and signature items (undeliverables) at retail postal outlet or station
• Drive to station and drop off vehicle • Drive to station or post office and drop off personal contact item sheet
• Wash-up (5 minutes) • No paid wash-up
• DEPART • LEAVE

 

(Click on above image for this Document in PDF)

 

Bulletin #020

February 9, 2012

NEW STAFFING PROCESS NOW APPLICABLE

As indicated in a previous bulletin the interest arbitrator appointed during the previous negotiations awarded the Union’s proposal concerning the staffing of vacant routes. Included in the new language that was to be incorporated into the collective agreement was a stipulation that the Union and the employer consult at the national level prior to the implementation of the new staffing process. That consultation has now occurred, as the parties have had two meetings at which the new staffing process was discussed. Consequently, any vacant routes that occur on or after January 23, 2012 should be filled in accordance with the procedure summarized below:

• The employer must post a notice advising of the vacant route and providing detailed information about it (Schedule “A” information) – posting to remain up for five days.


• During the five day posting period, interested RSMC members (both route holders and On Call Relief Employees) working within a seventy-five kilometre radius of the installation where the vacant route exists may submit an application to obtain the vacant route.


• Interested members from the installation where the vacant route exists must also submit an application if they wish to be considered for the vacant route.


• The vacant route is offered by seniority to the qualified route holders among the applicants.


• If still vacant after being offered to qualified route holder applicants by seniority the vacancy is then offered by seniority to the qualified On Call Relief Employee applicants.


• The applicant offered the vacant route (whether a route holder or On Call Relief Employee) does not have to accept the route offered to him or her.


• If still vacant after being offered to RSMC applicants the route is filled by an external hiring process.


• In order to be considered as a qualified applicant an RSMC member must meet the qualifications mentioned in clause 12.08 (formerly clause 12.05) – these include having passed the probation
period (clause 29.02), being able to fulfill the operational requirements of the route and having the ability to supply the specified vehicle.

RADIUS VERSUS DRIVING DISTANCE

One of the disagreements between the Union and the employer concerning the application of the language awarded by the arbitrator is whether the area of eligibility should be measured as a radius or as distance driven. The language awarded by the arbitrator contains the word “rayon” in the French text. This translates as “radius” and, as both the English and French texts are official as per clause 31.02 (b), the Union believes that the area of eligibility in each and every office in Canada and Quebec should be measured as a seventy-five (75) kilometre radius from the installation in which the vacant route occurs.

If the employer fails to fill a vacant route in accordance with the procedure summarized above a grievance should be submitted on behalf of the aggrieved member.

EXCEPTION TO NORMAL PROCEDURE

If a vacant route occurs in an installation that has a recall list (clause 23.01) the members from that installation, including any members who have been laid off and placed on the recall list, shall have an opportunity to fill the vacant route (or resulting vacant route(s)) prior to the employer reviewing applications from outside of the installation. This exception will continue to be applied within the installation until there are no names on the recall list or until the members on the recall list have had an opportunity to obtain any vacant routes within the installation.

Solidarity,

Donald Lafleur
4th National Vice-President & Chief Negotiator

2011-2015/Bulletin # 020

Bulletin_20_Feb_9_2012-RSMC-NEW STAFF PROCESS-PDF


 

January 30, 2012

RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No 06

UPDATE ON NEGOTIATIONS

The Union and the employer have recently had a number of meetings to discuss some of the proposals being made by the employer in the current round of negotiations. A brief explanation of the employer proposals, and the Union’s response, follows.

On-Call Relief Employees

The employer has recently provided details concerning its proposal to amend the usage of On Call Relief Employees at Canada Post. Canada Post is proposing two types of On Call Relief Employee at Canada Post. The first type of OCRE would be used in larger installations (or groupings of installations) where the cumulative amount of yearly annual leave entitlement by the route holders within the installation would provide a sufficient amount of work to the OCRE. These OCRE would be similar to the Relief Employees found in Group 2 of the Urban Operations collective agreement in that they would be hired on a permanent basis and have the provisions of the collective agreement applied to them. The second type would be similar to the current OCREs, who are offered work on an as needed basis and not entitled to all the provisions of the agreement.

The Negotiating Committee will continue to discuss this proposal with the employer in order to obtain additional information. We will also continue to raise our demands on relief employees and replacement workers, which include an employer obligation to cover all absences of route holders and to hire, train, call and pay replacement workers.

Determination of Work Day and Equitable Compensation

In its proposal the employer has proposed both a method of determining how the work days of individual RSMC members would be determined and a compensation scheme that would provide equal pay to RSMC members based on the number of hours worked per day. In the employer proposal each of the activities performed by RSMC members would be given a money value. This value given to each activity would then be multiplied by the number of times each day the activities were performed. The addition of these individual multiplications would then provide the wage for the length of the individual work day, with a standardized rate of pay.

The Union requires additional information in order to determine if the employer proposal will benefit the membership. Included in this Union determination would be factors such as the application of a standardized national hourly rate and the requirement that any system established through negotiations creates, as much as possible, eight hour routes.

Establishing an hourly rate is a priority for the union and per piece payments that entice workers to want work to be added to their work day is unacceptable. RSMC daily hours as stated in the schedule A are arrived at by applying a work measurement system that was included in the union’s language submitted to arbitrator Keller.

Draft Collective Agreements

The Union has sent copies of a draft collective agreement and the STDP to all Locals. This draft contains the changes made to the collective agreement as a result of the Keller interest arbitration decisions. It will allow Local Executive Committees and shop stewards to ensure that the membership receives the full benefit of the changes to the collective agreement while the official copy is being printed and distributed in accordance with clause 31.02.

BULLETINS AVAILABLE ON EDIGEST

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SHOP STEWARDS

Bring this information to the attention of the members during regular weekly shop floor meetings.

Solidarity,

Donald Lafleur 2011-2015/Bulletin #06-020

4th National Vice-President & Chief Negotiator

Bulletin 06 (020) RSMC- Update on Negotiations-PDF

 

January 30, 2012

RSMC Transition Committee Vacancy

Dear Sisters and Brothers:

Brother Chris Pleasants, member of the RSMC Transition Committee, was elected to the position of National Union Representative – grievance and arbitration at our National Convention in October. The National Executive Board has decided there is a need to replace him as a member of the RSMC Transition Committee (Article 34, RSMC Collective Agreement) for the duration of the committee’s mandate.

As such, we are soliciting applications from all CUPW members interested in taking on this work.

The work and mandate of the Transition Committee are described in Article 34 of the RSMC Collective Agreement. The successful candidate must have good knowledge and expertise related to the Committee’s mandate.

The successful applicant will be expected to start work in February or March 2012 in Ottawa. Accommodation, living expenses and travel costs will be covered according to the provisions of our National Constitution. Transition Committee members receive salary
at the Union Representatives’ rate.

Please submit a resume including experience in RSMC issues, particularly in route structuring and compensation, Union/Management consultation and a brief description of why you are suited for this position. The ability to work in both English and French is not required but would be beneficial. The successful candidate must be computer literate.

Applications should be sent to:

George Kuehnbaum

National Secretary-Treasurer

Canadian Union of Postal Workers

377 Bank Street

Ottawa, ON K2P 1Y3

Deadline: February 17, 2012.

In Solidarity,

Philippe Arbour

National Grievance Officer

(NEB-NEC/2720-c)

2011-2015/023

2012- 1-30 Bulletin 023 RSMC Transition Cttee Vacancy-PDF

 

 

 

December 21, 2011 - 10:00

RSMC Negotiations 2012 / Bulletin

2012 RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No. 5

Negotiations with the employer will not be completed before the current collective agreement's December 31, 2011 expiry. However, this does not mean that members are left without collective agreement protections while negotiations continue.

Clause 36.05 of the agreement indicates that the provisions of the collective agreement remain in full force and effect until either the parties have negotiated a new collective agreement or the requirements of section 89 (1) of the Canada Labour Code have been met. This section of the Code provides the process by which the employer may obtain the right to lock out its employees and the Union obtains the right to strike.

This means the collective agreement continues to apply after December 31, 2011. Members should continue to ensure that their rights and benefits are respected by the employer, using the resolution procedures in article 9 of the collective agreement.

Parties Continue to Meet

The parties continue to meet in sub-committees during the week of December 18 – 24, 2011, dealing with the demands listed under the headings of General and Union Rights and Operations. The General and Union Rights sub-table is dealing with various proposals such as shop steward rights and Human Rights protections (demands 31 – 41 & 48 – 50 in the August 2011 issue of Perspective). The Operations sub-table is dealing with various issues, including right-hand-drive vehicles, health and safety and workload (demands 11 – 24).

Negotiations to Continue in January

After this week's meetings, the parties have agreed to break until early January. The Union wants to negotiate a new collective agreement without undue delay, so the early part of 2012 will be a busy time for the Negotiating Committee and RSMC members.

Please continue to show support in 2012 for your demands and your Negotiating Committee -- stay aware of the issues, read Union bulletins, access the Union’s website and participate in activities organized by your local executive committees.

In solidarity,

Donald Lafleur
4th National Vice-President and Chief Negotiator

rsmc_neg2012_bul_05-in PDF

 

 


December 14, 2011 - 10:00

RSMC Negotiations 2012 / Bulletin

2012 RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No. 4

Following the first meeting between the Union and the employer on November 10, 2011, at which each party presented their opening statement, the parties have had approximately five (5) meetings at the sub-committee level. At these meetings the Union presented more detail to the employer about the Union’s package of demands. The demands discussed included those dealing with improved seniority rights (demands 43 – 47 in the August 2011 Perspective), Union Protection and Members’ Rights (demands 33 – 41), Health and Safety (demands 11 – 15). The Union has also had a general discussion with how the employer should utilize Relief Employees and Replacement Workers to cover the absences of route holders.

Union Raises Issue of Equity and Fairness

In a bulletin dated December 1, 2011 the Union reported on the recent victory by the Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC) in their lengthy struggle to win pay equity for the clerical and administrative workers working at Canada Post.

At a meeting held on November 30, 2011 the Union’s Negotiating Committee made a presentation to the employer’s Negotiating Committee concerning pay issues. The Union’s presentation indicated that the work performed by members of the RSMC bargaining unit is similar to that performed by members of the Urban Operations bargaining unit in the areas of skill, effort, responsibilities and working conditions. As such, in the interests of fairness and equity, RSMC members should receive benefits and wages which are similar or identical to the benefits and wages provided to Urban Operations members through the collective agreement.

The Union also pointed out that the current round of negotiations provided the parties an excellent opportunity to correct the inequities that currently exist between RSMC and Urban Operations members.

Future Meetings

There are presently at least three meetings scheduled for this week as well as additional meetings for next week, at which time the parties will continue to discuss various Union demands. The employer has also indicated that it will be soon ready to make presentations to the Union on the employer demands dealing with compensation, the pension plan and a proposed long-term disability plan. Once those meetings have been held, and additional information is received, the membership will be advised.

In solidarity,

Denis Lemelin
National President and Chief Negotiator

rsmcfrs_neg2012_bul_04_en



 

December 1, 2011

Post office workers win pay equity– at last!

 


Clerical and administrative workers at Canada Post have achieved a remarkable victory. The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled in favour
of the Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC) in a pay equity case that wasoriginally filed 28 years ago.

PSAC first filed a complaint about unequal pay at Canada Post in 1983. In 2005, the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal upheld the complaint. Canada Post subsequently used every possible legal avenue to have the tribunal’s decision overturned. On November 17, 2011, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled against the Crown corporation and in favour of the clerical and administrative workers involved in the pay equity complaint.

Equal pay for work of equal value

PSAC used the provisions of the Canadian Human Rights Act to argue that Canada Post failed to pay its clerical and administrative workers equal pay for work of equal value.

Pay equity relies on comparisons between jobs that have a similar overall value. It is the jobs themselves that are neutrally evaluated, not the people in those jobs. When jobs have the same total value, discrimination in wages is not permitted regardless of how many male and female employees are doing those jobs. Pay equity legislation defines value as a composite of four factors — skill, responsibility, effort and working conditions.

As a result of the law and the Supreme Court decision, Canada Post is now legally required to pay the workers involved in the PSAC complaint the difference between what they earned and what they would have earned if they had been fairly paid. PSAC expects this amount to be over a quarter of a billion dollars.
CUPW thanks PSAC and all the women who were part of this fight for equality. Their courage and determination inspire us.

RSMCs members deserve equality

Currently, CUPW is in bargaining for a new collective agreement for Rural and Suburban Mail Couriers (RSMCs). Over 70% of RSMCs are women. They too are fighting for equal pay and the same benefits and working conditions as urban postal workers.

CUPW is demanding equality for RSMCs for a number of reasons:


• RSMCs want equality. They want equality within their bargaining unit and with urban postal workers doing the same work.


• RSMCs deserve equality, which includes equal pay. They have the same kind of working conditions as letter carriers and do work that requires the same level of skill, effort and responsibility but do not currently receive the same compensation or treatment.


• Canada Post has a legal responsibility to provide workers with equal pay for work of equal value.


• It is the right thing to do and collective bargaining is the best way to ensure workers are paid and treated fairly. PSAC members struggled for 28 years to achieve pay equity. We need to support our RSMCs to make sure that they get pay equity and more at the bargaining table.

In Solidarity,
Denis Lemelin
National President
2011-2015 / Bulletin # 008
DL/bk cope 225

 

12-01-11_Bulletin__Pay Equity_008_PDF

 

November 3, 2011 RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No 38

Final Arbitration Award

The Union has recently received the interest arbitrator’s final decision concerning the negotiations between the parties under the
terms of the initial collective agreement. In his award the arbitrator made the following rulings:

TRANSITION COMMITTEE – status quo with current language.

PAID COURT LEAVE – members will be entitled to paid leave when they are required to serve on a jury.

PAID VACATION – members will be entitled to four (4) weeks of vacation leave after the completion of ten (10) years of employment.

STAFFING – vacant positions are to be filled by seniority from applications received from members working within seventy-five (75)
kilometres of the vacancy. Both route holders and On Call Relief Employees within the area of eligibility will be entitled to submit applications for the vacant position, although route holders will be given the first opportunity.

CHILD CARE FUND – a yearly amount of $260,000.00 will be placed in the Child Care Fund established through Appendix “L” of the Urban Operation collective agreement.

CORPORATE TEAM INCENTIVE – the employer’s Corporate Team Incentive will be applied to RSMC members effective December 31, 2011 – there will be no retroactive application for the 2011 calendar year.

APPENDIX “A” – the employer’s proposal to increase Appendix “A” was granted - payments to become effective on December 1, 2011.

ON CALL RELIEF EMPLOYEES – the Union and the employer may, through consultation at the local level, create additional On Call Relief positions if the local situation requires such additional positions.

MATERNITY AND ADOPTION LEAVE ALLOWANCE – effective October 26, 2011 members who are entitled to unemployment insurance benefits pursuant to either Section 22 or 23 of the Employment Insurance Act, or benefits from the Quebec Parental Insurance Plan, will receive an allowance that will “top-up” their wages to 93 % of his or her weekly wage.

DRUG PLAN – effective December 1, 2011 members will become entitled to a drug plan with the employer’s contribution being 95 % and members paying 5 %. Members will also be able to opt out of the Plan, in which case they may not opt back in for a period of twelve (12) months. The entitlement also applies to spouses (including “common law spouse”) and dependent children. Unfortunately the Plan will not apply to On Call Relief Employees or those route holders whose Schedule “A” provides for less than twelve (12) hours of work per week.

SHORT TERM DISABILITY PLAN (STD) – in spite of the vigorous opposition of the Union the arbitrator awarded the employer’s proposed STD effective December 1, 2011. One of the features of the employer’s proposal is that the number of personal days per year is raised from two (2) to seven (7).

TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE – in consideration of the awarding of the STD the arbitrator adopted, for the most part, the language proposed by the Union concerning technological change. As a result, the employer is required to negotiate with the Union about the introduction of technological changes that may impact RSMC members and to eliminate any adverse effects arising from the introduction of such technological changes.

RECONCILIATION FUND – although both parties had accepted in principle the establishment of a reconciliation fund, they had not agreed on the amounts to be placed in such fund. In his award the interest arbitrator indicated that any monies remaining after the implementation of the other parts of his award would be placed in a reconciliation fund for future pay out. Fifty percent of such monies would be paid out as a “lump sum” while the other fifty percent would be applied to a wage increase, with fifty percent of this amount to be split amongst all members and the remaining fifty percent being allocated to improve the wages of the lower paid routes. Although the amount of money put in the reconciliation fund depends on events that cannot be foreseen the Union believes generally that there may be in excess of $ 19,000,000.00 to be distributed once the parties have completed their reconciliation of the financial cap mid-year in 2012.

THE STRUGGLE CONTINUES

The Union believes that the arbitrator could have made additional changes to the collective agreement that would have improved the
relationship between the parties and provided the RSMC membership with necessary and positive changes to their working lives. Nevertheless, the parties are entering a new period of negotiations early in November and the Union will use those negotiations to ensure that the employer treat the RSMC membership in a fair and just manner, commensurate with the duties they perform for the employer as part of a national mail sortation and delivery system and their status as unionized employees.

BULLETINS AVAILABLE ON EDIGEST

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SHOP STEWARDS

Bring this information to the attention of the members during regular weekly shop floor meetings.

Solidarity,

Donald Lafleur 2011-2015/Bulletin # 001

4th National Vice-President & Chief Negotiator lk/cope 225

Bulletin 38 (001) - Final Arbitration Award-PDF


Rural and Suburban Mail Carriers Gear Up for Negotiations

October 13, 2011

(press release)

The Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) and Canada Post are going back to the bargaining table.

Today, CUPW gave notice to Canada Post to commence bargaining for its 7000-member Rural and Suburban Mail Carrier (RSMC) unit.

“These negotiations represent a historic opportunity to bridge the rural-urban divide that exists in our country,” said Denis Lemelin, National President of the Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW).

RSMCs deliver mail to rural routes and many suburban areas. While RSMCs and urban postal workers work side-by-side and perform the same duties, their wages, benefits and working conditions are far apart. For example, RSMCs often use their own personal vehicles and wear hand-me-down uniforms from urban postal workers. The
union is demanding that working conditions, wages and benefits, and health and safety protections be the same for all members.

“We are looking for fairness and equality for these members,” said Donald Lafleur, CUPW’s 4th National Vice President. “We currently have a workplace where RSMCs get
inferior treatment.”

The existing RSMC collective agreement took effect in 2004, and expires December 31, 2011.

2011-10-13 Rural and Suburban Mail Carrier-PDF

 


*TO PRINT THIS FLYER CLICK TO LINK (PDF) BELOW AND PRINT*

DEMANDS RATIFICATION RSMC NEGOTIATIONS 2011-PDF

 

 

September 22, 2011 RSMC Negotiations Bulletin No 35

ARBITRATION PROCESS COMPLETED

The lengthy negotiations for the final re-opener of the RSMC collective agreement, which began in October 2009, ended on
September 17, 2011 with the Union and the employer making their final arguments to the interest arbitrator. The negotiations period
was unnecessarily long primarily because of the unreasonable and intransigent positions taken by the employer.

In its final argument the employer reverted to the unreasonable positions it had initially proposed in October 2009. It did so even on
issues where the parties had reached agreement or had been close to reaching agreement during the mediation and
arbitration processes. These reversions included arguing for regionally based wage increases, a unsatisfactory sick leave plan,
unnecessary restrictions on access to a drug plan (excluding members who work less than 12 hours per week), no language providing protections against the introduction of technological changes, rejection of a maternity and adoption leave allowance and rejection of an increase in vacation leave entitlements.

Conversely, the Union argued for the proposals made in its global offer of June 23, 2011, which included a number of
modifications of its initial presentation to the employer.

ARBITRATION DECISION PENDING

The parties are now awaiting the decision of the arbitrator. While deciding how the $23.8 million and $15 million available in 2010 and
2011 respectively will be allocated the arbitrator will also rule on whether the non-monetary demands made by the Union, such
as improved transfer rights, should be included in the collective agreement.

At the end of the hearing the arbitrator indicated that he could not provide a specific date on which his award would be completed
however the Union hopes to receive it in four to six weeks.

MEMBERSHIP SUPPORT OUTSTANDING

During the lengthy negotiation/arbitration processes the spirit of the Union’s Negotiating Committee was continuously buoyed by the
messages of support it received and by the collective actions taken by RSMC members to show their support for their demands and
their opposition to those employer demands that were unreasonable. On behalf of the Committee I would like to thank the
membership for their continued support.

I would also like to thank the Negotiating Committee, Sisters Rose Johnson, Bonnie Pollard, Suzanne Simard and Kathy Zimmer,
for their hard work and dedication and the many hours they had to spend in Ottawa away from their friends and family. I would
also like to thank Brothers Geoff Bickerton, Director of Research and Ken Bird for the assistance they provided to the Committee.


UPCOMING NEGOTIATIONS

Due to the length of time taken to complete these negotiations/arbitration the Union will begin negotiating with the employer for a new collective agreement in the very near future.

As with these present negotiations the support of the membership for their demands and their Negotiation Committee will be crucial in order for the Union to achieve collective agreement changes in the next round of bargaining that meet the needs of the
membership.

Members should continue to read Union bulletins, access additional information on the Union’s website and participate in local activities.

SHOP STEWARDS:

BRING THIS INFORMATION TO THE ATTENTION OF THE MEMBERS

DURING REGULAR WEEKLY SHOP FLOOR MEETINGS.

Solidarity,

Donald Lafleur 2008-2011/Bulletin # 481

Bulletin 35 Arbitration Process Completed-RSMC-PDF

 

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Costa Kavadas

 

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DRAFT SETTLEMENT RSMC (IN PDF FORMAT)

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RSMC HOURLY WAGE CALCULATOR

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RATIFICATION TABLOID (IN PDF) CUPW PERSPECTIVE RSMC-NOVEMBER 2012

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Current RSMC Collective Agreement -in PDF
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Shop Stewards Manual -in PDF
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RSMC Negotiations 2012: Time for Fairness, Respect and Progress

RSMC PROGRAM OF DEMANDS

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RSMC Facts Sheet 1

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RSMCs have made gains (Fact Sheet 2)

RSMC Facts Sheet 2

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Putting an end to discrimination at Canada Post - Equality and pay equity now (Fact Sheet 3)

RSMC Facts Sheet 3

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